9 Replies Latest reply on Jun 9, 2011 6:27 AM by Peter Spier

    Crop Marks on the image

    indesignnovice

      Hi All

       

      I am producing some exhibition panels and our printer would like the crop marks actually on the image. When I export to PDF the crop marks appear in a white area around the image - is there any way I can remove that white area and show the crop marks on the image?

       

      Thanks

        • 1. Re: Crop Marks on the image
          Daniel Flavin Level 4

          Two options - I would design to final output size, in which case the crops created by pdf export would be correct (in theory).

           

          Second choice - From the scripts panel, you should (version dependent) have a Create Crop Marks script. Select all, than run the script.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Crop Marks on the image
            Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

            I'm not quite sure waht you mean by on the image, but offest of the marks is editable in the export dialog.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Crop Marks on the image
              indesignnovice Level 1

              Thanks Daniel, Thanks Peter

               

              Both helpful, but I've not quite cracked it.

              It's almost like the printer wants me to produce my background image bled all the way to the edge of the PDF and then the crop marks on the background image so it can be cut. But the export to PDF always places a white border around the edge. I know this will be trimmed.

               

              Perhaps its the size of the background....or the size of the document on InDesign. I have created the background in Photoshop and then placed on a document of the size of the finished print job.

               

              Any further help, greatly appreciated.

               

              Thanks

              • 4. Re: Crop Marks on the image
                Grant H Level 4

                If i am understanding you correctly... reduce the offset of the cropmarks to nil (err iff the bleed iss less than 5mm then minus (5 + bleed) minus when u export to PDF

                 

                G

                • 5. Re: Crop Marks on the image
                  Daniel Flavin Level 4

                  We're approaching a point where a screen shot of your pdf's might be worth a thousand words.

                  There's not much rocket science to exporting a pdf with crops, assuming two things -

                   

                  1 - Your document setup is accurate to the final trim size, and bleeds are included correctly if used.

                   

                  2 - The printer is following some basic standards; not always the case.

                  • 6. Re: Crop Marks on the image
                    Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                    You may have to add the marks manually if setting the offset to 0 in not sufficient.

                     

                    As a matter of principle, however, even the standard offset is really too small. The marks should always be outside the bleed area so they are guaranteed to be trimmed off, even if the cutter is so far out of whack that you use 100% of the bleed allowance along an edge.

                    • 7. Re: Crop Marks on the image
                      macinbytes Level 4

                      If you have illustrator you can remove the marks. InDesign's marks will be .25 pt Registration 100% stroke and have a 1.25 pt Registration 0% stroke behind them.

                       

                      You could delete those out in Illustrator if you have that as an option.

                       

                      If you want to go the script route to imitate the same size and shape as the out of the box indesign cropmarks use the Scripts Panel Crop marks, select only crops. 15 pt crops 6 pt offset .25 pt thickness. The script won't add the duplicate set of crops with 0% registration behind. Make sure that your stroke type is set to solid (topmost stroke option) before running the script.

                      • 8. Re: Crop Marks on the image
                        John Hawkinson Level 5

                        Daniel lists two choices. A third choice is to use InDesign's custom cropmarks feature, which came up twice today! Wow!

                        See http://forums.adobe.com/message/3637984#3637984, etc. for some more details. It is a bit tricky to set up, but works well once it is done.

                         

                        I'd like to second Daniel's second post:

                         

                        We're approaching a point where a screen shot of your pdf's might be worth a thousand words.

                        Please post a mock-up of what you want, it would be very much more helpful!

                         

                        Macinbytes wrote:

                        If you have illustrator you can remove the marks. InDesign's marks will be .25 pt Registration 100% stroke and have a 1.25 pt Registration 0% stroke behind them.

                        If I may, I would like to strongly disagree with this suggestion. Illustrator is not a tool for generic editing of PDF files. It has been known to cause problems when editing mildly complicated InDesign documents, and the set of PDF files it can edit and operations it can perform is not a superset of InDesign's. It is partially overlapping.

                         

                        Also, any hand-editing of marks is going to be a pain. Why include the marks if you are just going to remove them? Mark them in InDesign as Peter suggests.

                        • 9. Re: Crop Marks on the image
                          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                          Not having a clue about what the work is, I will say that the one reason for having marks inside the trim area that I can think of is for hand-trimming large-format output. It's prettu common to d that with a rotary trimmer, or even a straightedge and blade.

                           

                          But better than crops in that situation is to add a full perimeter stroke to follow. You trim on it, or just inside, and you can't lose your reference for the next edge.