9 Replies Latest reply on Jun 8, 2011 2:49 PM by Peter Spier

    Advice on best practices on book proof stages

    George Krompacky Level 1

      I'm wondering how others go about book projects when you move from one proof to the next, in the context of using InDesign's book panel to manage your project.

       

      1. I create a first proof in InDesign, send PDFs to contributors, and they approve or give me changes.
      2. This brings me to the second proof. Those PDFs are sent to an external proofreader.
      3. When the proofreader's comments come back, I incorporate them into the final proof, which goes to indexers.

       

      Because of the way things can get mucked up, I need to keep the first, second and final proofs separate, so that I can go back to figure out where things went wrong, if they did go wrong. So there is an individual directory for each stage; furthermore, so that it is easy to tell what I'm looking at, the file name of each chapter reflects the stage "1_StupidBook_proof1.indd" and so on.

       

      So what do people usually do in InDesign, in terms of the .indb file. Do you just rename all the files to "xxx_proof2" and edit the .indb file, removing the old pages and adding the new? Seems cumbersome. Rename the files and create a NEW .indb file?

       

      Just curious about how others do it. Appreciate any input.

        • 1. Re: Advice on best practices on book proof stages
          John Hawkinson Level 5

          I don't work much with books, but here's my 2 cents.

           

          I would not rename the files. I would try to keep each folder as an isolated self-contained environment with the same Book.indb and Chapter.indd (etc.) filenames. When the working document is all set and it is time to save a proof, I would Book > Package Book for Print to a new folder (proof1). That will copy the book file and all INDD files to the new folder, and it will update the paths in the INDB file to point to the new copies of the INDD files.

           

          (Please note that paths in INDB files are absolute paths, not relative. So if you just copy the folder in the Windows Explorer or the Macintosh Finder, your INDB file will be pointing at all the old INDD documents, which could be a recipe for mass confusion. So never do that.).

           

          Additionally, if you are feeling paranoid, you can rename the original working folder (perhaps name it work20110607). That will ensure that there are no copies of the INDB files floating around that will reference the current, working, potentially more recent versions of the INDD files. This should not be necessary, but it is somewaht of a belt-and-suspenders sort of thing.

           

          As long as you use Package for Print, you will produce working copies of the book.

           

          This process will save you from having to manually rename each file and do so again within the book.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Advice on best practices on book proof stages
            Eugene Tyson Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            I put all the files into a book.

             

            Then I make a PDF of each chapter to be proofed called <filename_v1.pdf>

             

            I never make a second version of the Indesign files (only for backup - which is zipped and any duplicate files deleted)

             

             

            I would have folders for each chapter

             

            Chapter 1 proofs where each version would reside in PDF format only.

             

             

            Absolutely on no occasion do I keep versions of InDesign files.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Advice on best practices on book proof stages
              George Krompacky Level 1

              Thanks John and Eugene for your input. 2 different approaches.

               

              Both your methods avoid having to rename files, which is good. And yet there is at least one advantage to having a renamed file that I can see, and that is having the file name embedded in the footer of the PDF. I have 10 or more people responding to me about corrections and some of them in person with physical printouts. There are occasions when being able to look at a page and instantly identifying it as the first, second or final proof is very useful. Don't know if that makes sense.

               

              Eugene, your practice of never having multiple copies of ID files (except for a backup) both makes sense to me and scares me. I suppose I just find it comforting to know that if something goes completely bonkers that I can at least revert back to the previous proof and rebuild from there. But this may be essentially a superstitious concept.

              • 4. Re: Advice on best practices on book proof stages
                Grant H Level 4

                as far as tracking changes/comments from the PDF...

                 

                if you send the PDF out as a shared review or attach for email review using the Acrobat review interface... acrobat will create necesary files that will track changes as they happen... ITS DAMN GOOD for what you want, I use it all the time, experiment and explore that option. Once you go past the basics of it, you will never do "that" another way...

                 

                G

                • 5. Re: Advice on best practices on book proof stages
                  John Hawkinson Level 5

                  Note that you can put whatever information you want in the footers of your

                  document, and certainly having an indicator of the version is very useful.

                   

                  But there's no reason you need to depend on the file name for that...

                   

                  What mechanism are you using such that you see the file name, anyhow?

                   

                  If you use the Page Information "crop" mark, you should also get the

                  date/time, which should be useful -- or are you saying that is not

                  instant enough for you since you need to do a lookup to determine

                  which date corresponds to which version?

                   

                  Note that if you zip files (or copy them), rather than Packaging them,

                  your book file will still point to the original pathname, not to the

                  files that are in the same directory as the copied book file. This may

                  or may not matter to you.

                  • 6. Re: Advice on best practices on book proof stages
                    George Krompacky Level 1

                    Grant: I may experiment with that approach. Thanks for the suggestion.

                    • 7. Re: Advice on best practices on book proof stages
                      George Krompacky Level 1

                      John: I have variables in the master page footers, one is the file name and one is the date (last changed, I think?).

                       

                      And one serious drawback with this method, obviously, is that I have to remove it from each chapter in the final proof.

                       

                      So your suggestion of the page information option under crop marks is a much better idea. Thanks.

                      • 8. Re: Advice on best practices on book proof stages
                        John Hawkinson Level 5
                        I have variables in the master page footers, one is the file name and one is the date (last changed, I think?).

                        And one serious drawback with this method, obviously, is that I have to remove it from each chapter in the final proof.

                        Ah -- that wasn't obvious to me. You can have any of 3 dates as text variable, the creation date, the modificaiton date, or the output date.

                        One approach would be to use a custom text variable that you could syncrhronize across your book. That way you could specify "PROOF1" and then remove or change the variable across all chapters in a single operation.

                         

                        So your suggestion of the page information option under crop marks is a much better idea.

                        I am not sure it is the way to go, though. If you print on oversize pages (e.g., if your book size is smaller than letter and you print on letter, or smaller than tabloid and you print on tabloid), it is easy enough to print at 100% and the Page Info will appear on the paper outside the area of your book.

                         

                        If you don't do that (most of us don't have that luxury), then you can consider moving the page marks inside the live region of the page. Doing this requires exploiting an undocumented feature of InDesign, custom crop marks, which requires hand-editing a custom file... See http://forums.adobe.com/message/3637984#3637984, etc. for directions. Some might consider this too much of a pain...

                        • 9. Re: Advice on best practices on book proof stages
                          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                          Have you considered adding a SLUG area to the file and putting the variables in that? You can include the slug when creating proofs, and exclude if you feel the need in the finals, but it doesn't really matter since it gets trimmed off.