5 Replies Latest reply on Jun 9, 2011 8:06 PM by JaysonM-Y

    Green Screen and Electronics with shiny surfaces...

    JaysonM-Y Level 3

      Not sure if the Lounge is the place to ask this one, but where I'm at the client doesn't have the budget to facilitate a pro making 3D models of the products they're advertising, but he wants them spinning. The products are needed with alpha. My idea was to try and put em on a spinning green pedistal on green screen with lights trying to get rid of green reflections. I'm probably on the wrong path here, so I'm asking for advice before embarking on what could be an epic fail(not that I still won't try it)...

        • 1. Re: Green Screen and Electronics with shiny surfaces...
          asinclair@ithaca.edu Level 1

          This is a similar problem as "Removing Tint from Green Screen" (previous post). Any shiny surface will naturally reflect the background/sky etc. If you spin your objects against green that is what they will reflect. However when you replace the green with whatever background you choose the shiny objects will appear to reflect that new back, and that should look OK in many cases because that is what shiny objects do anyway. Of course the new back will not be distorted appropriately, specially notorious if the objects have curved surfaces but if the reflective areas are confined to a small part of the image this won't be a problem, and if you really want to deal with this then you can use "warp" to manipulate that part of the reflection.

           

          Normally when you photograph a reflective product is better to create a "tent" that surrounds it and illuminate the object/product throught the material of the tent (usually thin white fabric or diffusion material). Even large objects like automoviles are photographed this way to emphasize their aereodynamic shape (so that it is not broken by unwanted reflections.

           

          Good luck with your client

          • 2. Re: Green Screen and Electronics with shiny surfaces...
            Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

            Your biggest problem will be "chrome reflections", that is areas where the greenscreen ends and hits the studio ceiling or floor begin and naturally any spotlights and shades showing up as reflections... Compared to that, the actual green screen is not really the issue, but of course proper preparation and all the dirty tricks like using flat hair spray to reduce reflections will still be necessary. In the end you may spend so much time with the lighting, you could have rendered it in 3D in the same time, but feel free to try. Also don't get too locked into that "spinning" idea. There may be other ways to present the products just as well with individual views and little bit of fancy layer swirling or partial camera moves, e.g. tracking by the product on a green screen table. The problem really will be that there is no way in hell to get perfect lighting that works on all sides of the product while it spins, but you may be able to get it perfect for particular angles...

             

            Mylenium

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            • 3. Re: Green Screen and Electronics with shiny surfaces...
              JaysonM-Y Level 3

              My coligue had suggested not to go for a full spin around the object but a slight noticable movement. I was thinking about putting it on a spinning surface and just evenly lighting so only the camera's current view has not green reflections and then spinning the stuff... but yeah even then it might pose a problem...

              • 4. Re: Green Screen and Electronics with shiny surfaces...
                Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                This is more of a photography question than an AE question. I shoot chrome all the time. For smaller items I always use a light table. Shooting green screen with highly reflective surfaces requires you to build a white or textured tent completely around your subject leaving only the background visible. This means over, under, and on both sides must be completely surrounded with something that you'll want to see in the reflections. I call it building a tent. Inside that tent you'll need to put some dark, maybe even gray or black items. I use fingers and strips of blackwrap. Sometimes I even have to make a hole in a white show card for the lens to shoot through to avoid the camera reflection.

                 

                Check out this link: It shows excellent technique. Pay particular attention to the description of the technique. If chrome isn't nearly perfect in the camera it's nearly impossible to get right in post.

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                • 5. Re: Green Screen and Electronics with shiny surfaces...
                  JaysonM-Y Level 3

                  Thanks for the help guys. Taking in the advices given, I'll see what can be done on shoot day... looks like I'll go get some white and black cartridge paper as well should be a fun day.