10 Replies Latest reply on Aug 30, 2011 10:43 AM by SuperCrawler

    System build for CS5.5. Contemplating whether or not to wait for Q1/Q2 2012.

    SuperCrawler Level 1

      It's nice to dream... the Waimea Bay platform with Sandy Bridge E... with plenty DIMM slots... with the required PCI-e lanes to accomodate more than a 16 x PCI-e nVidia card with CUDA support to enable hardware MPE acceleration... with a large RAID array...

       

      "More than double almost everything a processor can offer: double the cores, double the PCI-e lanes, triple the memory, more than double the L3 cache, increase the PCI-e support from 2.0 to 3.0, etc..." (Adobe Forums: Tapeless workflows and Sandy Bridge or...)

       

      I hope someone can answer my following questions concerning some yet-to-be released components, because I am not sure that I got it right.

       

      • Will the Sandy Bridge E processor be a 32 nm processor?
      • Will Sandy Bridge E fit in socket 2011?
      • Will Sandy Bridge E require the X79 (Patsburg) platform?

       

       

      Presentation: Intel Announces New 22nm 3D Tri-gate Transistors (PDF 6.4MB), May 2, 2011.

       

      • Will the 22 nm die shrink of Sandy Bridge, codenamed Ivy Bridge, be compatible with the Waimea Bay platform?
        • 1. Re: System build for CS5.5. Contemplating whether or not to wait for Q1/Q2 2012.
          Scott Chichelli Level 3

          the direct replacement for X58 is X79

          it will have ONLY 4 memory slots but yes it will be QUAD memory.

          limiting it to 16gig ram on release. we can only hope that 8 gig non-ecc is to follow shortly, or maybe by then.

          X79 is socket 2011 yes.

          it will be 22nm

           

          if i were to speculate i would say the only difference in the sandy we have today and the upcoming ivy.

          bear in mind this is NOT an architechtural change technically

           

          1) die shrink: usally means slightly increased GHz and cooler (potential for higher OCs)

          2) 6 core to start with more cache than present quad sandy, 8 core later in 2012 (Xeons will have 8 core out of the gate is my guess)

          3)the tri-gate may show some performance gains.. it seems more related to low voltage use for the bigest gains.

          4) if we are lucky a 20% gain over todays sandy

          5) biggest benefit is more PCIe lanes

           

          Scott

          ADK

          • 2. Re: System build for CS5.5. Contemplating whether or not to wait for Q1/Q2 2012.
            Harm Millaard Level 7

            Scott,

             

            Care to elaborate on this statement:

             

            if we are lucky a 20% gain over todays sandy

             

            At the same clock speed, if will have newer architecture, quad memory versus dual memory, it will have 50% (hexa) or even 100% (octo) more cores , it will have 200% to 250% more L3 cache, it will use double the PCIe lanes and the bandwidth of the PCIe lanes is increased by a factor 2 in comparison to today's Sandy. It sounds like you are overly pessimistic. But, OTOH, it sounds like good salesmanship, to deter people from waiting for the next generation and clinch your sales now.

             

            My guess is that the new Sandy Bridge E, even in hexa core models will be at least 50% faster.

            • 3. Re: System build for CS5.5. Contemplating whether or not to wait for Q1/Q2 2012.
              leo'ssite

              I can load a project in either PRPro and encore but when I try to play by using

              space bar, nothing happens. I have not used the program in over a week and can't

              figure out what the cause is?

              Leo.

              • 4. Re: System build for CS5.5. Contemplating whether or not to wait for Q1/Q2 2012.
                SuperCrawler Level 1

                Scott,

                Thanks for your reply.

                 

                Unless I missed something, I didn't find my questions answered in your post #1 above.

                Please keep in mind that I am a newbie.

                 

                the direct replacement for X58 is X79

                This is interesting, but it was not one of my questions.

                 

                X79 is socket 2011 yes.

                It was not one of my questions either.

                 

                it will be 22nm

                Which of my four questions in my original post is this the answer for?

                 

                it will have ONLY 4 memory slots but yes it will be QUAD memory.

                limiting it to 16gig ram on release. we can only hope that 8 gig non-ecc is to follow shortly, or maybe by then.

                It was not one of my questions either, but I will add the following.

                 

                A review on the first Gigabyte-branded socket LGA2011 motherboard, GA-X79A-UD3, which was on show this month at Computex, reads “Mind you, this is just the cheapest LGA2011 board from Gigabyte, there is a higher-end line of X79 motherboards, so don't let the unspectacular looks of the UD3 get you.” (Gigabyte X79 UD3 LGA2011 Motherboard First Shot)

                 

                Surely the higher-end line of X79 motherboards will have more memory slots, else they wont be very popular among high-end users?

                • 5. Re: System build for CS5.5. Contemplating whether or not to wait for Q1/Q2 2012.
                  Jim_Simon Level 8
                  it will be 22nm

                  Which of my four questions in my original post is this the answer for?

                   

                  The first one.

                  1 person found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: System build for CS5.5. Contemplating whether or not to wait for Q1/Q2 2012.
                    SuperCrawler Level 1

                    Jim,

                    JSS1138 wrote:

                    it will be 22nm

                    Which of my four questions in my original post is this the answer for?

                     

                    The first one.

                     

                    Thanks for your reply.

                     

                    The reason I asked my question “Will the Sandy Bridge E processor be a 32 nm processor?”, was because I read from A Look Into Intel's Next Gen Enthusiast Platform : Sandy Bridge E & Waimea Bay, April 15 2010, page 2, “Waimea Bay HEDT platform's CPU of choice is a 32nm Sandy Bridge-E part.”.

                     

                    If your answer is true - that Sandy Bridge E is a 22 nm processor, and not a 32 nm processor - then I have the following question.

                     

                    • If the yet-to-be released 22 nm Sandy Bridge E fits the Waimea Bay platform, will the yet-to-be released 22 nm Ivy Bridge processors also fit the Waimea Bay platform?

                    • 8. Re: System build for CS5.5. Contemplating whether or not to wait for Q1/Q2 2012.
                      Scott Chichelli Level 3

                      Harm,

                      based on ys of experiance.

                      lets just look at your system.

                       

                      1) 4 core vs 6 core  based on your system (45nm) 4 core ousts numerous 6 core 32nm..

                      conclusion 4 vs 6 is not all that, 2nd conclusion dies shrink is not all that...

                       

                      remember GHz is king over more cores unless doing heavy animation.

                       

                      2)more cache?  again your system?  cache is nice but not a huge reason for improvement

                       

                      3) biggest reason its NOT an architectural change. there are some minor changes

                       

                      4) adding more PCIe lanes will NOT change benchmarks  we have sandy bridge sysytems killing dual Xeons

                       

                      5) sandy has shown that Dual VS tri is pretty much irrelavent. again sandy beating all but the 980/990. and that depends on the test.

                      in out test it did beat the 980x. (including 16 vs 24Gig) so quad memory may help in some aspects but dont look to it as some big increase

                       

                      6) lastly every new processor generally has between 10-20% increase over last..  i thought 20% was being generous.

                      and i am basing that assumtion on OCed systems not stock defaults. with a die shrink comes better OCing.

                       

                       

                      now in all fairness Nehalem (965) was a Huge jump in performance over the last gen Yorkfield(Q9650 or 9770) the single largest increase in Intel history.

                      about a 40% increase. and actually from the 9770 to the 975 (last of the nehelam) it was more like 50%. rather drastic.

                       

                       

                      lets back up a moment..  older 870 Lynfield was a semi cripled nehelam, or budget i7.

                      the performance differences from an 870 to a 920 was fairly negligible.  about 10%

                      with sandy to Ivy we are talking about the same thing budget vs higher end  (backwards release by Intel is still hard to get)

                      quad to quad i dont expect much more than 10% or a tad more

                      quad to 6 core about 20%.

                       

                       

                      """"But, OTOH, it sounds like good salesmanship, to deter people from waiting for the next generation and clinch your sales now.""""

                       

                      careful there Harm

                      thats crossing the line big time.

                      after all this time you know dang well i am not about the sales it that were true i would be pushing Dual Xeons not the least costly sandy 2600...

                       

                       

                      Scott

                      ADK

                      • 9. Re: System build for CS5.5. Contemplating whether or not to wait for Q1/Q2 2012.
                        C_BRAUN

                        Technicaly Harm your correct from what I am seeing 30% of Ivy Bridges performance will come from Intels new 3d gate tech and 20% or so should come from die shrink/layout of chip improvements, from what I am reading, but 20% = 30% doesn't always = 50% improvement.

                         

                        Soapbox time....(feel free to skip while I make a personal rant not directed at anyone)

                        Don't get me wrong Ivy Bridge will be a major improvement but, if your like some of us waiting is not nessiarily saving money if you are having to balk at cleints deadlines because of older gear. Also given that how we use our gear is chaging and the bottelnecks of systems are also gaining in disparity, a faster CPU is not always your best speed improvement even after good disk I/O. I saw someonone post an editing system not to long ago with killer stats...and minumum RAM for a 3d system with some compositing, I physically winced while reading. All those super fast cores need disks to push them the frames sure, but if you can only work on 2 frames at a time in RAM your killing yourself for anything but cuts only editing.

                        • 10. Re: System build for CS5.5. Contemplating whether or not to wait for Q1/Q2 2012.
                          SuperCrawler Level 1

                          I didn't want a Sandy Bridge, so I decided to search for a second hand X58 platform and found and bought the following PC at a good price from a gamer who decided to go Apple, while I wait to see Q3 next year to see what happened with what's coming.

                           

                          CPU : Intel Core i7-920 2.67GZ

                          Motherboard : GA-EX58-UD3R

                          RAM : 6GB

                          HHD : 1 X 320GB, 2 X 250GB, 2 x 1.5TB

                          Video Card : GTS 450 Nvidia

                           

                          Thanks everyone who contributed in helping me get more clever!