5 Replies Latest reply on Jun 23, 2011 5:14 PM by the_wine_snob

    Fixing echoing audio in Premiere/Soundbooth

    espaxefan

      I recently videotaped a coworker demonstrating one of our company's products with a Sony Handycam and a ECM-HW2 wireless microphone. Unfortunately, I had the mic set to pick up audio from both the camera and the microphone, and when I played back my footage in Premiere CS5, there were several clips where the audio had a noticeable tunnel-like echo becuase I had gotten too close to the person I was recording. I was scouring forums (this one included) to find the best possible way to clean up this echo, whether in Soundbooth or right in Premiere.  I tried messing with different audio effects (parametric eq, separating the tracks, etc) but nothing worked.  I'm not a pro when it comes to audio editing software or tools, so any advice is greatly appreciated.   From what I could pick up in the forums, fixing echo is a headache-inducing pursuit. If there's anything that might work here, please explain it to me in the most lay terms possible. Thanks all!

        • 1. Re: Fixing echoing audio in Premiere/Soundbooth
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          Removing that echo will be tough, to impossible.

           

          You have frequencies, that overlap, so if you address the frequencies, you'll be taking down both the original and the echo.

           

          For general background noise, there are tips in this ARTICLE, but I really do not think that anything there will work.

           

          Maybe some heavy-hitting audio guru will teach us both something. If so, I will gladly add their instructions to the article above.

           

          I think that you might be in for a re-shoot, or living with the audio, and altering the micing techniques next time.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

           

          PS - Welcome to the forum, and I would also post to the SoundBooth and to the Audition forum. For the latter, ask for general techniques for working on such in Audition (do not mention PrPro, or SB), and then we'll see if they apply in SB.

          • 2. Re: Fixing echoing audio in Premiere/Soundbooth
            Stanley Arthur Level 3

            You might try using the Expander in the Dynamics plug-in. It's not a very good one since it doesn't have ADSR (attack, decay, sustain, release), but it might help a little. Try setting it to -20 with a ratio of 1.5 o 1.75. You also might need to adjust up or down from -20. I don't hold out a whole lotta hope that this will help, but it's worth a try.

            • 3. Re: Fixing echoing audio in Premiere/Soundbooth
              shooternz Level 6

              Did each mic record to separate tracks (hopefully) or were they both mics to both tracks( unfortunately).

               

              If you got lucky....try

               

              Deleting one of the Tracks using either Fill Left or fill Right

              • 4. Re: Fixing echoing audio in Premiere/Soundbooth
                espaxefan Level 1

                It was definitely the unfortunate situation you described. I did try the fill left and fill right tracks, but the echo was present in both.  Thankfully its only on one segment that the echo is most pronounced.  I'll definitely be more careful next time. Thanks for the help!

                • 5. Re: Fixing echoing audio in Premiere/Soundbooth
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  Glad to hear that it was somewhat limited in your Project. Even with a full-featured DAW, and hours to fiddle and listen, such an echo is really, really tough. It's not too different from shooting and recording in an environment, where there is music w/ vocals in the background, and trying to remove that from the voices that one wishes to keep. A hint of cleanup might be "as good as it gets."

                   

                  What you hear as an "echo" is probably a tad of latency between the devices and also the distance from the speaker.

                   

                  Such is why I try to use very narrow field mics, and only record in mono. The greater the isolation of the Audio sources, the easier it is to address later on.

                   

                  Good luck,

                   

                  Hunt