3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 5, 2011 11:50 PM by Jeremy bowmangraphics

    Index level 4 para style - why keep with next line?

    Jeremy bowmangraphics Level 2

      When InDesign generates an index in the usual way, it creates a default paragraph style for each level. The first line indent of each level is 7 pts. greater than the one that precedes it. In addition to that formatting, the fourth and final level has a keep option: keep with next line (1 line). Can anyone explain the rationale for that? Am I missing something obvious again?

        • 1. Re: Index level 4 para style - why keep with next line?
          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

          I don't do indexes, generally, so I really can't answer, but I'm surprised none of the long-doc people have responded. Consider this a bump to put it back on the radar.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Index level 4 para style - why keep with next line?
            [Jongware] Most Valuable Participant

            I've created a couple of indexes, but I don't think I've ever ventured as far south to include a fourth level.

             

            Besides. Huh ... relying on InDesign to create default paragraph styles? I handcraft mine before I need'em.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Index level 4 para style - why keep with next line?
              Jeremy bowmangraphics Level 2

              [Jongware] wrote:

               

              I've created a couple of indexes, but I don't think I've ever ventured as far south to include a fourth level.

               

              Besides. Huh ... relying on InDesign to create default paragraph styles? I handcraft mine before I need'em.

              Me too, I was just re-creating index generation via scripting, and for checking and user-familiarity wanted exactly the same formatting as you get when you generate an index in the usual way. I couldn't see what purpose was served by that keep option in level 4.

               

              I suppose there might be some situations in which all four levels are used, especially if you follow the rule of thumb than there shouldn't be more than six locators for each index entry. Maybe a big book on taxonomy? As I recall, Microsoft Word allows up to six levels.