8 Replies Latest reply on Jul 17, 2011 7:07 PM by eatChocolat

    Which files to save prior to formatting?

    eatChocolat

      Hi there!

       

      I am going to format Windows 7 today and I would like to know which files and folders I need to save for one of my premiere pro projects to be able to re open it once Windows has been reinstalled?

       

      Do I need the preview files and encoded files? Or do I just need to save my .prproj file and place all my video in the same directories after the reinstall?

       

      Thanks for your help!

        • 1. Re: Which files to save prior to formatting?
          joe bloe premiere Level 5
          Do I need the preview files and encoded files?

          No. They will be regenerated when you re-open the project.

           

          do I just need to save my .prproj file and place all my video in the same directories after the reinstall?

           

          Yes.

           

          Be meticulous. You don't want to miss anything.

           

          You might want to use the Project Manager:

           

          Archiving

          • 2. Re: Which files to save prior to formatting?
            Powered by Design Level 4

            Hard drives are cheap.

             

            Buy yourself a new hard drive and install it there.

             

            Then if you missed anything you can always reload the old hard drive and get the info.

             

            Also you shouldnt be saving your projects and resources on you C: drive anyway.

             

            The more drive you spread your work over the better.

             

             

            GLenn

            • 3. Re: Which files to save prior to formatting?
              John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Before you format... unless you have something like a virus infection you can't erase so you MUST format... read

               

              http://windowssecrets.com/newsletter/win7s-no-reformat-nondestructive-reinstall/

              • 4. Re: Which files to save prior to formatting?
                eatChocolat Level 1

                Thanks everyone for your quick answers.

                 

                @joe bloe:

                I'll check out that Archiving link.

                 

                @Powered by design:

                I have a laptop so can't really install a new hard drive as easily as on a desktop.

                Also about saving on the C drive. I don't. I always save on the second partition in case something goes wrong and I have to reinstall windows. Drive D won't need to be formated. Except in this case cause I need to create 2 new partitions therefore ALL DATA will be erased (but copied onto my external hard drive)

                And I didn't understand what you mean by "The more drive you spread your work over the better" ?

                 

                @John Smith:

                Don't worry it has nothing to do with viruses. Last time I formatted I made two partitions and I thought 50Gb would be fine for the windows drive. So I wanna format to make 2 new partitions, and make sure the windows drive gets a good 100Gb

                Plus I format my computer quite often to keep it clean and organised! And I love the whole process of reinstalling rearranging everything! Bit of a geek haha

                • 5. Re: Which files to save prior to formatting?
                  John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  >two partitions

                   

                  If all you do is keep STATIC copies on the 2nd partition... if you try to USE that 2nd partition for any video editing task... VERY bad idea!

                   

                  One hard drive has one set of read/write heads, and actually using a partition during video editing... for anything at all... is a HUGE drain on the drive

                   

                  My 3 hard drives are configured as... (WD = Western Digital)
                  1 - 320G WD Win7 64bit Pro and all program installs
                  2 - 320G WD Win7 swap file and video project files
                  3 - 1T WD all video files... input & output files
                  .
                  Search Microsoft to find out how to redirect your Windows swap file
                  http://search.microsoft.com/search.aspx?mkt=en-US&setlang=en-US
                  .
                  Trying to use only ONE Hard Drive for Video Editing
                  .
                  You are a music conductor, with a baton that you use to point to various parts of the orchestra... this is like Windows pointing to various parts of the hard drive to do Windows housekeeping or to load program segments for various functions
                  .
                  Now, at the same time and with the same hand... while still using the baton to conduct the orchestra... pick up a bow and play a fiddle... this would be doing something with your video file at the same time as all the other work
                  .
                  You as a person cannot do both at the same time with the same hand
                  .
                  A computer is a LITTLE better, in that it can switch from one kind of task to another very quickly... but not quickly enough for EASY video editing
                  .
                  You need AT LEAST two hard drives (separate drives, never a partition http://forums.adobe.com/thread/650708?tstart=0 for more) with Windows (or Mac OS) and software on your boot drive, and video files on a 2nd drive so the boot drive is not slowed down by trying to do everything
                  .
                  I find that the three drives I use work very well for me, for editing AVCHD video... some people use a 4th drive, so video INPUT files are on drive three and all OUTPUT files are on drive four... I only bought a mid-tower case instead of a full tower case (my bad... but had to fit in the space available on my office desk!) so I use the three drives that will fit
                  .
                  Depending on your exact hardware (motherboard brand & model AND USB2 enclosure brand & model AND external hard drive brand & model) AND the type of video file, you may... or may NOT... be able to use an external USB2 hard drive for SD (Standard Definition) video editing
                  .
                  Steve Grisetti in the Premiere Elements forum http://forums.adobe.com/thread/856208?tstart=0 and Jim Simon in the Premiere Pro forum http://forums.adobe.com/thread/856433?tstart=0 use USB externals for editing
                  .
                  A USB3 hard drive connected to a motherboard with USB3 is supposed to be fast enough for video editing (I don't have such, so don't know) but eSata DOES have a fast enough data transfer for video editing... I have not used this eSata Dock... for reference only, YMMV and all the usual disclaimers
                  .
                  http://www.amazon.com/Thermaltake-BlacX-eSATA-Docking-Station/dp/B001A4HAFS/ref=cm_cmu_pg_ t

                  1 person found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: Which files to save prior to formatting?
                    eatChocolat Level 1

                    Thanks for the link to the article made by Hull. Very interesting and I learned a few things!

                    Unfortunately I only have a laptop for now and one hard drive in it. Therefore I have to partion it in fear of losing valuable data in case windows get unrepairable.

                    • 7. Re: Which files to save prior to formatting?
                      Harm Millaard Level 7

                      Partitions do not protect you in such a case. You need to reformat the whole disk anyway, so your 2-nd partition is lost with all the data on it.

                      • 8. Re: Which files to save prior to formatting?
                        eatChocolat Level 1

                        Harm Millaard wrote:

                         

                        Partitions do not protect you in such a case. You need to reformat the whole disk anyway, so your 2-nd partition is lost with all the data on it.

                         

                         

                         

                        Wrong. Partitions do protect you in case Windows is irrepairable. You don't need to reformat the whole disk. Only the partition with windows on it. Or just reinstall (not repair) windows on the same partition it has originally been installed on.

                         

                        In both cases the 2nd partition will not be affected and will still be accessible once windows has been reinstalled on the 1st partition.

                         

                        In this particular case, I want to recreate 2 different partitions, so I need to reformat the whole disk to increase the size of the 1st one and lower the 2nd one.