5 Replies Latest reply on Jul 26, 2011 5:14 AM by Steve Grisetti

    Lag/Rendering Issues with Premiere Elements

    toaonyk

      During my studies, I was using Premiere Pro, with which I was able to work (though I was always under the impression that I was toying with little more than the tip of an iceberg). After leaving the university, I looked out for another video-editing program, and since most comments asserted that Premiere Elements was a good choice for non-professional video-editing, and certainly satisfactory for everyday use. So I obtained a copy of PElements, which was fairly cheap in comparison to its big brother.

       

      However, after trying to edit two videos into one (the same scene taken by different cameras), I have to admit I'm somewhat disenchanted.

      The biggest bone of contention is the terrible lag. PPro was already burdened by those, but they didn't make the program almost unworkable. So I started rendering the two video tracks, which would have taken approximately 4 hours for a mere 11:30 minutes (x2) of video material.

       

      I was using the following system for this:

       

       

      Intel Pentium Dual CPU E2180

       

      2 GHz

       

      4 GB Ram

       

      Windows 7

       

      32bit

       

       

      The video files I worked with were converted versions of camera tapes, already changed to Avi with the help of the following conversion programs (I had to convert them because for some unknown reason, my old Premiere Pro refused to work with AVCHD or vlc.tod-files, so I didn't bother to try it here).

       

       

      Free Video Converter V3.0.0.0 (Koyote Soft)

       

      Output Format Avi

       

      Codec MS-Mpeg4-V2

       

       

       

      Any Video Converter (MPlayer)

       

      Output Format Avi

       

      Codec Mpeg4

       

      So, my question would be: is that normal? I would assume that, if anything, Elements would be faster than Pro since it's less convoluted, but appearently I was mistaken. What's the reason - is the system outdated, do I have to use particular presets for a videoclip, or is the data file format I used to blame for one or the other or both of my problems?

       

      (other issues are that the cutting and color modification tools are far cruder than those of PPro, but I assume that's intentional)

        • 1. Re: Lag/Rendering Issues with Premiere Elements
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          The problem may be that you didn't use the correct specs when you converted your video -- or that you didn't properly set up your project.

           

          Your computer is also on the lower end, when it comes to working with hi-def and, in particular, AVCHD video.

           

          Also, can you be a bit more specific about a few things?

           

          What model of camcorder is your video coming from?

           

          When you started your Premiere Elements project, what project settings did you select? If you've selected the proper project settings for your video, you should see NO red lines above the clips on your timeline until you add effects to them. Is that the case in your situation?

           

          Converting can sometimes work -- but it depends on what you're converting to and if it's really a more efficient format to work with. (Again, if it is you will see no red lines above the clips on your timeline.)

           

          It's quite possible that you're converting to a format that is even LESS compatible with the program. So, before you start converting, let's see how the program performs when you're using video directly from your camcorder in a project optimized for that video.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Lag/Rendering Issues with Premiere Elements
            toaonyk Level 1

             

            First, thanks for the quick answer.

             

            Your computer is also on the lower end, when it comes to working with hi-def and, in particular, AVCHD video.

             

             

             

            Can’t say, since I already “downsized” it to a simple AVi file with a mere fraction of the original bitrate.

             

             

             

             

             

            What model of camcorder is your video coming from?

             

             

             

            The  AVCHDs are coming from a Canon Legria HF200, the .TODs are from a JVC Everio.

             

             

             

             

             

            When you started your Premiere Elements project, what project settings did you select? If you've selected the proper project settings for your video, you should see NO red lines above the clips on your timeline until you add effects to them. Is that the case in your situation?

             

             

             

            Yes, the red lines were there, that’s why I started rendering the video track (the rendering didn’t take 4 hours as initially calculated, but “only” 1:30h. Though it left the second, underlying track untouched; and I had to render a second time when exporting the video.

             

             

             

            Converting can sometimes work -- but it depends on what you're converting to and if it's really a more efficient format to work with. (Again, if it is you will see no red lines above the clips on your timeline.)

             

             

             

            It's quite possible that you're converting to a format that is even LESS compatible with the program. So, before you start converting, let's see how the program performs when you're using video directly from your camcorder in a project optimized for that video.

             

             

             

            If it’s possible to work with converted videos that behave as if they already were rendered, that might be my problem (as I said, my videos were simple AVI-files using mpeg4-codecs). Though it’s somewhat irritating that I used exactly the same data files for premiere pro without encountering these problems (apart from the fiendishly time-consuming rendering during the export, which I still couldn’t get rid of)

             

             

             

            What annoys me most is that if it wasn’t for the multiple tracks, I'd simply skip the part where I mess around with the colors and use the movie maker instead

             

             

            • 3. Re: Lag/Rendering Issues with Premiere Elements
              Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

              Your Canon shoots in a variety of formats. If you plan to edit in Premiere Elements, you should only shoot in FXP or MXP mode. (Let's leave the Everio out of the mix for this portion of the experiment, since those cams have their own unique challenges.)

               

              You should then opem a Premiere Elements project using the project settings for Full AVCHD 1920x1080 stereo.

               

              Use Premiere Elements Get Media/From Flip and AVCHD Camcorder to import the video from your camcorder to your computer and place the video on the timeline. You should not see red lines above the clips.You should also see pretty good performance as you work with it.

               

              Beyond that, your computer may be underpowered to work with this type of video. Hi-def video can take considerable time to render, particularly on a dual-core machine. But converting it to another format using another program isn't going to improve things much unless you know for sure your converter is producing perfect Type 2 DV-AVIs.

               

              In fact, you can produce Type 2 DV-AVIs from this AVCHD video using Premiere Elements. Just place your AVCHD video on this time and then go to Share/Computer/AVI and select the DV preset. The video it produces should work very well in a project set up for DV Widescreen. It will be standard definition rather than hi-def -- but, if you're planning to output your final video in standard def (such as online or on a DVD) you might as well work with it in this format.

               

              But do as I described above as your experiment. Don't try anything high end and don't mix the Everio format into your project yet and see if that improves things.

               

              Once you figure out a clean, efficient workflow that works with optimal video formats, you should see a significant improvement in performance.

               

              But for now, stay away from third-party video converters. They seem to be working against you.

              • 4. Re: Lag/Rendering Issues with Premiere Elements
                toaonyk Level 1

                Thanks a lot! Not only did choosing the appropriate project type (camera) and the camera files resolve the rendering issues, but also made it possible to freely choose the resolution and reduced the export rendering time by ~95%. By the way, adding a track with the .tod-files (from the JVC Everio) didn't cause any additional problems (at least not that I'm aware of).

                • 5. Re: Lag/Rendering Issues with Premiere Elements
                  Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                  Great news, toaonyk! Happy moviemaking!