3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 26, 2011 10:15 AM by Rick Gerard

    Problem Keying out Glasses in After Effects

    NicholasDDyer

      Hello,

       

      I am new to After Effects and have struggled in the past pulling out a good key. I recently filmed a subject on green screen who was wearing glasses. After the shoot I realized that the "green" was showing through his glases and when I tried to key out the green it ended up keying out part of his entire eye. Do you have any suggestions on how to fix this?

       

      I read in another post about masking the glasses on a new layer but I am unsure how to exactly do that. I attached the image so you can see what I am working with.

       

      Thanks,

       

      Nick

       

      Screen shot 2011-07-26 at 10.35.45 AM.png

        • 1. Re: Problem Keying out Glasses in After Effects
          Dave LaRonde Level 6

          I read in another post about masking the glasses on a new layer but I am unsure how to exactly do that.

           

          1. Keep the keyed layer
          2. Duplicate it and remove the keying effect on the TOP layer
          3. Double-click on the top layer, opening it in the layer window
          4. Use the pen tool to create a mask
          5. Click the stopwatch on the Mask Path property
          6. Move down the timeline and reposition the mask when necessary
          7. Be prepared for working a long time, and splitting the top layer several times if necessary

           

          This is After Effects 101-type stuff.  You should know that if you're doing this for a paying customer, you have no business offering your services as an AE practitioner.  You don't jump into the AE Pool using the diving board, you start in the AE Kiddie Pool to learn the basics.  There are simply too many ways AE can hose and frustrate the uninitiated to do anything else.  This a fine place to get started:

           

          http://www.peachpit.com/store/product.aspx?isbn=0321734866

           

          This is good, too, but you don't get the benefit of always having project files to work with:

          http://blogs.adobe.com/toddkopriva/2010/01/getting-started-with-after-eff.html

           

          This is also good:

          http://www.videocopilot.net/basic/

          ...and don't worry if this link uses an versions than yours, the principles remain the same.

          • 2. Re: Problem Keying out Glasses in After Effects
            Navarro Parker Level 3

            Well, I'm not sure there is a problem to "fix". If you were filming him against a brick wall, you would see the brick wall warped in his glasses.

             

            The chromakey making that part transparent is how it should work. The only thing you'll be missing is the warping cause by the lens.

            • 3. Re: Problem Keying out Glasses in After Effects
              Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Here's the fix. You need to do some tracking, duplicate and mask the background, add some distortion to the masked copy of the background, and then composite. and color match.

               

              On the top copy of the footage you need to track the movement of the glasses and apply the tracking data to a null.

              Now you need to mask just the glasses, pull a key of the distorted area and and layer in a distorted copy of the background layer to the glasses.

              Once you have a good replacement for the glasses tie the background and the distortion to the null so that it moves when the actors head moves.

               

              Now pull a key from the bottom copy of the background layer. The top keyed copy will replace the glasses on the bottom copy and you'll end up with something like this:

               

              Screen Shot 2011-07-26 at 10.01.58 AM.png

              I used bulge to distort the moved and scaled background. You can see the bulge effect.  To complete the composit tie the position of the distortion effect to the null with the tracking data with an expression.

               

              Next time, either use flat glass in the frames or remive the glass entirely.

               

              Here's a comp w/o footage or tracking data to get you started.