20 Replies Latest reply on Apr 18, 2012 2:40 AM by Jcena6159

    Suitable laptop for video editing

    Misha_cz

      Hello,

      for months now I am looking for a suitable laptop for video editing of  my footage captured by Canon 60D (and also GoPro). Since it is in a HD quality and h.264  format it puts a great strain on the CPU. I already had to return an  ASUS U30J and Dell XPS14 both with i7 processors because of their  terribly slow performance :(. So now, I really want to be 100% sure that  the laptop will be able to smoothly handle my footage. I am using Adobe  Premiere Pro CS5 for video editing and I do need a laptop (preferably 15'')  as I travel all the time.

      Here are the specifications of the Force 16F2 laptop built on MSI 16F2 (from the xoticpc.com), which I have chosen so far:
      FORCE 16F2 / MSI 16F2
      -  15.6” FHD 16:9 LED Backlit Wide screen (1920x1080) Super Clear Glare Type Screen
      -  2nd Generation Intel® Core™ i7-2720QM, 2.2-3.3GHz, (32nm, 6MB L3 cache)
      -  IC Diamond Thermal Compound - CPU + GPU (Cools better than all Compounds)
      -  nVidia GeForce GTX 560M 1,536MB PCI-Express GDDR5 DX11
      -  12,288MB (12GB) DDR3 1333MHz Dual Channel Memory (2x4GB 2x2GB)-
      -  Standard Finish

      -  - 500GB (w/ 4GB SSD Memory) Seagate XT 7200RPM NCQ Hybrid 32MB Cache (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s)-   or 750GB 7200RPM 16MB Cache Buffer (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s)--

      - 750GB 7200RPM 16MB Cache Buffer (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s)-
      -  Raid 0  Stripe Enabled (Requires 2 or 3 Hard Drives. Combines Hard Drives for performance)
      -  500GB 7200RPM 16MB Cache Buffer (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s) in ODD Bay
      -  3 Year Complete Care Warranty - 3 Year Parts with Ground Shipping, 24/7 Telephone Tech Support & Lifetime Labor Warranty

      I would like to ask you what do you think about this configuration  regarding my requirements? Will this system be powerful enough to handle  the h.264 footage? I would like to use both the SLR camera and the laptop as long as possible and don't have to change the laptop in one year time or so. That's why I would like the system to be powerful enough to withstand even future demands of the software, etc.

      I was also not sure about the 500GB (w/ 4GB SSD Memory) Seagate XT 7200RPM NCQ Hybrid 32MB Cache (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s. Do you think it is a smart choice? Is the 4GB SSD memory of any use? Or should I rather go with the 750GB 7200RPM 16MB Cache Buffer (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s)?

      I don't have any previous experience with the raid system, do you think that the
      Raid 0  Stripe Enabled (Requires 2 or 3 Hard Drives. Combines Hard Drives for performance) is the right choice for smooth video editing? I know that I have to use at least 2 hard drives so that's why I'd rather order 3 HDD to get the best performance..

      This configuration is worth 1800USD, I would obviously like to save some  money as I will need to pay also the shipping costs, tax and duty (I  currently live in New Delhi)... So if you think that something from the  system might be downgraded and I would still get good video editing  results, please let me know.

      Do you think that the
      3 Year Complete Care Warranty - 3 Year Parts with Ground Shipping, 24/7 Telephone Tech Support & Lifetime Labor Warranty is of any use when I am not from the US? Should I rather go with the 1 Year warranty?

      I would very much appreciate any feedback from you!

      Misha

        • 1. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
          Frédéric Segard Level 2

          A first thought comes to mind... "Oh boy... been there... done that... got the t-shirt.... and most importantly... never again!"

           

          I'm pretty sure you'll get a lot of mix answers as far as editing on a laptop for video editing. Unless it's your fall back, travel "part-time" editing computer. Which it is clearly not.

           

          But since you're dead set on editing on a laptop as you main machine, and you're editing H.264, the worst codec ever (processor wise), don't skimp out on anything. Just get the best of what you can get now. Laptops aren't, for the most part, upgradeable. And what you get, is what you'll have for a long time.

           

          For starters, because of the reflective nature of glossy screens, they are a nightmare to edit on, depending on where you are. And since you travel a lot, you're bound to have reflections galore. I mean, they are nice to work on in a light controled environement, but useless otherwise. I suggest this one "15.6" FHD 16:9 "Matte Type" Super Clear Ultra Bright LED Anti-Glare Screen w/ 95% NTSC Color Gamut (1920x1080)", because of it's seemingly color "accuracy"... although I can't vouch for that, because I've never seen an actual product from them.

           

          I know you are on a tight budget. I could have said a lot, and pushed for more and faster, etc. But look at it this way. When selecting your components, you can take the least amout you can for the upgradable options. Meaning RAM and Hard disks. While having 12GB of RAM is good, 16 is better. But I'm going to say, get 8GB (2x4GB), and later on buy another 8GB (2x4GB) from your local dealer when you have the budget. As for hard drives, I think their hard drive selections suck big time. You want SATA III 7200 RPM drives with the biggest amount of cache. Why they only have SATA II is beyond me. So get the cheapest ones, and swapt them out for bigger and faster drives. If you are going to put a third hard drive in the optical bay, you'll have no choice to order one, because of the cage it comes in. Unless you can order it seperately. As for SSDs, I'd very much enjoy them on a limited laptop, and would not hesitate to use them. But they are more expensive with less capacity. But speed counts for a lot in a laptop, especially if your projects aren't big, and you offload old ones on a regular basis. As for the rest, get the best you can: Screen, as shown above, and the fastest CPU your budget allows.

           

          As for RAIDs on a laptop... NEVER EVER RAID 0 hard disks together (SSD it's ok). The chance of failure on a laptop that travels a lot is enormous.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
            Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Frédéric Segard wrote:

             

            As for hard drives, I think their hard drive selections suck big time. You want SATA III 7200 RPM drives with the biggest amount of cache. Why they only have SATA II is beyond me. So get the cheapest ones, and swapt them out for bigger and faster drives. If you are going to put a third hard drive in the optical bay, you'll have no choice to order one, because of the cage it comes in. Unless you can order it seperately. As for SSDs, I'd very much enjoy them on a limited laptop, and would not hesitate to use them. But they are more expensive with less capacity. But speed counts for a lot in a laptop, especially if your projects aren't big, and you offload old ones on a regular basis. As for the rest, get the best you can: Screen, as shown above, and the fastest CPU your budget allows.

             

            Frederic,  I agree with you, but it might be hard to find SATA III laptop drives that do not exceed the power requirements of those listed disk drives.  The biggest problem in high performance laptops is heat.  Secondly, you will not find much if any performance difference in SATA II versus SATA III on single drives and since you are nixing RAID 0 you will even have less advantage for a pair of SATA III drives..

             

            Now if you could just afford one of the newest generation =/> 500 MB/second SSD's you could really take advantage of the SATA III disk interfaces on these notebooks.  The much lower power of the SSD's will be ideal for notebooks.  One for the project and one for output--WOW!

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
              Frédéric Segard Level 2

              Yeah! 3x 7200RPMs.... I have just one in my laptop and my left hand warms up nicely. Perfect for those cold winter nights. In his case, it will warm up his left and right hand, as well as his forehead when it hits the trackpad when he dozes off on all-nighter. lol

               

              But you are right Bill, three in a laptop will be way to much concerning heat buildup, not forgetting power hungry, battery sucking, and possibly power supply life threatning. But I remember some laptops a while back, were designed to be custom built, much like this one, and able to handle a lot of load. I would have imagined this type of laptop to be similar. Designed to handle some stress. I don't know that brand, so I can't make assumptions. But who am I kidding... Today's components are a lot more demanding then what we used to have years back.

              • 4. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                Misha_cz Level 1

                Hello Frederic and Bill,

                 

                thank you very much for your answers. I will try to find out whether I would be able to get the specific components (RAM and hard drives) here in India and for how much. I am  really not sure if I would be able to get everything cheaper here, but I  will see. Regarding the heat up, that would obviously be of a big  concern to me. Do you think it is better to go for only two SATA disks  and connect the third one externally either via eSata or USB3?

                 

                Thanks to Bill's answer I am also thinking about buying the

                120GB OCZ Vertex 3 MAX IOPS Sandforce Solid State Drive (Up to Sequential Read 550MB/s - Write 500MB/s SSD Serial-ATA III) ( + 281 ) and two SATA disks, might this option help to prevent the overheating? There is no way for me to buy two SSDs though .  With the one SSD for OS, do you think I would still need so much RAM? I  am also not sure about the 8GB ram option you suggested (then adding  another 8GB) as I am not sure how many socket the chipset has but I  guess there might be only two sockets meaning I would have to buy  another 8+8GB. Is that correct?

                 

                To be honest, I am still quite puzzled about everything .  Not sure whether to go for the SSD, not sure whether to go for 2 or 3  HDDs, etc. I would appreciate if you could help me with that. I have  read too many mixed answers about SSD and the performance of Adobe  Premiere Pro to be completely sure about it. My opinion is that the  500MB/s speed should be of some benefit for the editing but I don't have  any proof for that. Yet in general I think it might be a smart move as  it seems that the SSD disks will be replacing conventional disks in the  future and so my laptop may remain "up to date" for a longer time.

                 

                I honestly admit that I am a complete newbie to all these technical  specifications and still gathering information so I might be completely  wrong in everything and that's why I am trying to get a helpful reply from people who really know..

                 

                I was also reading a lot good things about Sager computers, do you think a Sager might be better suited for video editing than this rebuilt MSI laptop? I will try to figure out some alternative configuration of Sager and post it here soon.

                 

                PS: Since right now I am without a laptop for video editing, I would need to order the new machine as soon as possible (it will take time to build the machine, ship it, etc.)... So I would really appreciate quick answers!

                • 5. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                  Frédéric Segard Level 2

                  If you can afford an SSD for your OS drive, it will help keep thing cool. And speed things up in certain situations. Because it's fast, you can put the page file on it. Although only SATA II, as Bill pointed out, you won't see a night and day performance difference over SATA III HDDs on a laptop. So depending on the project size you do normally, get what you need. Contrary to most laptops, this one having the option to have three, will greatly benefit PremierPro.

                   

                  But since you are on the subject of having external devices... If you don't mind having them when traveling (you would already have your external optical drive anyway). You could go with an external USB3 or eSATA drive or RAID. USB3's total throughput is fast at 5Gbps, and could get some sort of portable RAID5 arrray eventually. But if you simply get a single USB3 connected SATA III drive to start with, it will be good enough. I suspect the eSATA port to only be SATA II speed (but I may be wrong), and would be limited to 3Gbps. But still, it's good enough for H.264.

                   

                  On the other hand, in the future, if you think you would go with an external USB3 RAID5 solution, you could think of upgrading the two internal HDDs to 2x SSDs. When the time comes, compare the prices, as SSDs are always getting cheaper. SATA III SSDs with 500MBps+ transfer speeds is something to consider (I'ts like having about 5 HDDs in RAID0 in one disk speed-wise... give or take. Minus the capacity of course). By then, if you still edit H.264, 2x 480GB drives (or even 2x 240GB could do VERY nicely. But that depends on your workflow, naturally. You should always offload your old projects to keep things tighdy.

                   

                  As for RAM, having a faster SSD is no excuse to get less RAM. PremierePro uses RAM well. It loves it! The more you have, the better it will perform. The laptop has room for 4 RAM modules. There are no 8GB modules yet, so you can't get 2x 8GB. So your only option to get 16GB is 4x 4GB. Your previous configuration's RAM setup was 2x 4GB + 2x 2GB. I was suggesting 8GB for keeping the initial price down. Because if you eventually think to upgrade your RAM to 16GB, if you took 12GB RAM, you would essentially "loose" 2x 2GB modules when upgrading them to 2x4GB. But 12GB is better then 8GB. And if you don't think you'll upgrade, then stick with 12GB. Otherwise, think 16GB.  I don't know what the prices in India are like, but normaly, buying RAM 3rd party is cheaper then buying it from certain vendors. You'll need to compare. It may very well be that it's cheaper for you to go 16GB right away. Like I said before, on a laptop, don't skimp-out. Get the most you can.

                   

                  As with anything, when buying a new computer, your workflow will dictate your purchase decision. Some Questions like these will help detemine what you need. Typicial project size? How many projects do you work on at a time? Is it only H.264 footage? Are you always on a deadline, rushed in anyway? What type of work you do? (Corporate, event, fiction, broadcast, indy filmmaking?)

                  • 6. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                    Scott Chichelli Level 3

                    to be clear Sata 300 vs Sata 600 is completely a moot point unless talking about the newest SSDs

                    there is absolutely NO benchmarkable difference in sata 300 vs 600.

                    desktop or laptop. in fact i have seen where seagate sata 300 slightly out performed wd sata 600...

                     

                    as far as a laptop. there will be only 2 sata 600 ports in one as with most desktop boards.

                    meaning the 3rd HDD would be on sata 300 anyway.

                    lastly there is no sata 600 laptop drives i know of as of yet. at least not the major players

                    and doing ADVHD to H264 works very well on newer SB laptops as has worked well on X58 laptops for 2 yrs

                    Scott

                    ADK

                    • 7. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                      Misha_cz Level 1

                      Frederick, I will firstly answer your questions, I am in no way a pro video editor, my projects are up to 10MB of size although I wasn't yet able to edit the h.264 footage properly ... I mostly do events and quite simple projects, effects, two to three timelines... I use only h.264, my older projects are in DV quality thought. I usually have to rush to finish a project since I have limited time during the travels.. I usually work at one, maximum two projects at the same time

                       

                      Now, I have been trying to figure out what would be the best configuration for me and ended up with these two options, which are touching (maybe even overflowing) my budget... Both are worth around USD2100 (without shipping, etc.). Either I  will be going for one SSD disk for the OS or for maximum CPU and RAM.  Which configuration would you recommend me? Do you think that the second configuration is an overkill when taken into account the size and scope of my projects?

                       

                      With SSD disk:
                      FORCE 16F2 / MSI 16F2
                      -  15.6” FHD 16:9 LED Backlit Wide screen (1920x1080) Super Clear Matte Type Screen
                      -  2nd Generation Intel® Core™ i7-2720QM, 2.2-3.3GHz, (32nm, 6MB L3 cache)
                      -  IC Diamond Thermal Compound - CPU + GPU (Cools better than all Compounds)
                      -  nVidia GeForce GTX 560M 1,536MB PCI-Express GDDR5 DX11
                      -  10,240MB (10GB) DDR3 1333MHz Dual Channel Memory (1x4GB 3x2GB)
                      -  Standard Finish
                      -  - 120GB OCZ Vertex 3 MAX IOPS Sandforce Solid State Drive (Up to Sequential Read 550MB/s - Write 500MB/s SSD Serial-ATA III)
                      -  - 750GB 7200RPM 16MB Cache Buffer (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s)-
                      -  HDD Raid Settings - OFF
                      -  320GB 7200RPM WD or Seagate (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s) in ODD Bay
                      -  3 Year Complete Care Warranty - 3 Year Parts with Ground Shipping, 24/7 Telephone Tech Support & Lifetime Labor Warranty

                       

                      With better CPU and RAM:
                      FORCE 16F2 / MSI 16F2
                      -  15.6” FHD 16:9 LED Backlit Wide screen (1920x1080) Super Clear Matte Type Screen
                      -  2nd Generation Intel® Core™ i7-2820QM, 2.3-3.4GHz, (32nm, 8MB L3 cache)
                      -  IC Diamond Thermal Compound - CPU + GPU (Cools better than all Compounds)
                      -  nVidia GeForce GTX 560M 1,536MB PCI-Express GDDR5 DX11
                      -  16,384MB (16GB) DDR3 1333MHz Dual Channel Memory (4x4GB)-SPECIAL
                      -  Standard Finish
                      -  - 750GB 7200RPM 16MB Cache Buffer (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s)-
                      -  - 750GB 7200RPM 16MB Cache Buffer (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s)-
                      -  HDD Raid Settings - OFF
                      -  320GB 7200RPM WD or Seagate (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s) in ODD Bay
                      -  Stock OEM Thermal Compound (       IC Diamond Thermal Compound - CPU + GPU Provided FREE with Processor Upgrade!)
                      -  Internal 7-in-1 Card Reader (MS/MS Pro/MS Duo/MS Pro Duo/SD/Mini-SD/MMC/RS)
                      -  Internal Bluetooth + EDR
                      -  Built-in 802.11 Wireless B/G/N - Stock Wireless Card
                      -  Integrated Digital Video Camera
                      -  Sound Blaster Compatible 3D Audio - Included
                      -  Smart Li-ion Battery (9-Cell)
                      -  3 Year Complete Care Warranty - 3 Year Parts with Ground Shipping, 24/7 Telephone Tech Support & Lifetime Labor Warranty

                      Frederick, regarding the RAM I checked the 8GB option and it comes in 2GBx4 so I won't be able to save those slots. Plus I have been searching for prices of the RAM, HDD and SSD in the US and they don't seem to be that great for me to even consider them... I would simply have to pay more and would end up with unused parts from the basic configuration. I think that the Xoticpc have quite reasonable prices of the upgrades they offer... Plus I can count on higher prices of the components here in India so all in all I think that it would cost me too much energy and save me minimum bucks...  That's why I thought I might go for the 16GB RAM straight away if it isn't an overkill for me. As I said before, I would love to save money (after all I am a woman   who controls the common budget) so please let me  know, if I am just wasting money for high end technology which I won't be able to use . I rather think that in the future once I will finally be able to make  some money when I will have a machine to work on, I might upgrade to  better hard drives (SSD possibly). But right now I need a laptop on  which I would be able to smoothly edit the HD h.264 footage.

                      Thank you very much for your help!

                      • 8. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                        Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        Misha_cz wrote:

                         

                        Hello Frederic and Bill,

                         

                        thank you very much for your answers. I will try to find out whether I would be able to get the specific components (RAM and hard drives) here in India and for how much. I am  really not sure if I would be able to get everything cheaper here, but I  will see. Regarding the heat up, that would obviously be of a big  concern to me. Do you think it is better to go for only two SATA disks  and connect the third one externally either via eSata or USB3?

                         

                        Thanks to Bill's answer I am also thinking about buying the

                        120GB OCZ Vertex 3 MAX IOPS Sandforce Solid State Drive (Up to Sequential Read 550MB/s - Write 500MB/s SSD Serial-ATA III) ( + 281 ) and two SATA disks, might this option help to prevent the overheating? There is no way for me to buy two SSDs though .  With the one SSD for OS, do you think I would still need so much RAM? I  am also not sure about the 8GB ram option you suggested (then adding  another 8GB) as I am not sure how many socket the chipset has but I  guess there might be only two sockets meaning I would have to buy  another 8+8GB. Is that correct?

                         

                        To be honest, I am still quite puzzled about everything .  Not sure whether to go for the SSD, not sure whether to go for 2 or 3  HDDs, etc. I would appreciate if you could help me with that. I have  read too many mixed answers about SSD and the performance of Adobe  Premiere Pro to be completely sure about it. My opinion is that the  500MB/s speed should be of some benefit for the editing but I don't have  any proof for that. Yet in general I think it might be a smart move as  it seems that the SSD disks will be replacing conventional disks in the  future and so my laptop may remain "up to date" for a longer time.

                         

                        I honestly admit that I am a complete newbie to all these technical  specifications and still gathering information so I might be completely  wrong in everything and that's why I am trying to get a helpful reply from people who really know..

                         

                        I was also reading a lot good things about Sager computers, do you think a Sager might be better suited for video editing than this rebuilt MSI laptop? I will try to figure out some alternative configuration of Sager and post it here soon.

                         

                        PS: Since right now I am without a laptop for video editing, I would need to order the new machine as soon as possible (it will take time to build the machine, ship it, etc.)... So I would really appreciate quick answers!

                        Misha

                         

                        I would definitely go for the three drive configuration so you have the mounting hardware for future expansion/substitution, but unless you have huge projects or need many online projects at the same time I would use a hard drive for the OS/Applications and with the SSD for use on all the current project files.  That very fast internal SSD has the same performance as a five hard disk RAID 0 with none of the disadvantages (except capacity).  With the third large hard drive you can "archive" other projects and media as you finish the projects but still have them available with you..  The only thing that the SSD offers as an OS drive is is faster bootup and application opening time plus of course lower power consumption. but no speed up of editing.  This system (with a fast CPU and greater than 12 GB of RAM definitely would give you great editing performance.

                         

                        I do not know if the MSI uses a similar case but I have seen YouTube videos of the ease of upgrading memory modules on the very comparable ASUS G74SX laptop of actually disassembling the whole unit.  If you do want an SSD for OS/Applictions there is no good reason to buy this very expensive one.

                         

                        Sager computers are great computers but like this one are custom configured so you order what you can afford.  I think sometime in the past I saw that there was a Sager dealer in India but could not find it right now.

                         

                         

                        Fredric

                         

                        "There are no 8GB modules yet, so you can't get 2x 8GB". You might have to qualify the statement to read:  "There are no affordable 8GB modules yet..." For only $760 each you can buy 8 GB SODIMM memory modules

                        • 9. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                          Scott Chichelli Level 3

                          there are also well made laptops that have 4 memory slots so 16 gig (4x4G) is easy to do...

                          personally i would not touch an MSI... lots of warranty issues and fail rates.. and SSD is a waste of $

                          • 10. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                            Frédéric Segard Level 2

                            Bill Gehrke wrote:

                            "There are no 8GB modules yet, so you can't get 2x 8GB". You might have to qualify the statement to read:  "There are no affordable 8GB modules yet..." For only $760 each you can buy 8 GB SODIMM memory modules

                             

                            Ouch on the price!  But my point was in reality, but should have specified, will the mobo accept 8GB modules?

                            • 11. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                              Frédéric Segard Level 2

                              To quickly summarize, and Bill proposed an elegant HD solution:

                               

                              - No real need for an OS and App SSD, get a conventional HDD.

                              - An appropriately sized speedy SSD for you project/media drive. But a fast 7200RPM HDD would be just as good for H.264.

                              - A large 5400RPM HDD for exports and off-loading old projects on the go.

                               

                              One 7200RPM will not be a big problem, heat wise, in a Laptop. But get te fastest CPU you can afford. And 16GB is by all means NOT overkill. The more the better! And don't forget to choose the non glare screen.

                               

                              As with all things, budget in mind, there is no one perfect solution. As I said initially, you will get various points of view, especially when it comes to laptop configurations. The needs of one, don't necessarily reflect the needs of others. It all depends on what you are going to do, and what budget you are willing to allocate. Will the above configuration work better then another? Hard to really say. If you haven't done much editing, and haven't gone though a few editing workstation, you can't really know. The way you work will greatly influence your buying decision. Next editing solution you buy, you'll know exactly what I mean.

                              • 12. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                                Frédéric Segard Level 2

                                JCschild wrote:

                                 

                                to be clear Sata 300 vs Sata 600 is completely a moot point unless talking about the newest SSDs

                                there is absolutely NO benchmarkable difference in sata 300 vs 600.

                                desktop or laptop. in fact i have seen where seagate sata 300 slightly out performed wd sata 600...

                                 

                                as far as a laptop. there will be only 2 sata 600 ports in one as with most desktop boards.

                                meaning the 3rd HDD would be on sata 300 anyway.

                                lastly there is no sata 600 laptop drives i know of as of yet. at least not the major players

                                and doing ADVHD to H264 works very well on newer SB laptops as has worked well on X58 laptops for 2 yrs

                                Scott

                                ADK

                                I stand corrected. I guess I had WD Raptors in mind when I was mentioning SATA3 2.5" drives. Mea Culpa! And Raptor HDDs are really NOT suitable for laptops anyway. I guess I had my nose too deep in research for my own new workstation these past weeks.

                                • 13. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                                  Misha_cz Level 1

                                  Ok, so you suggest me to add to the second configuration an properly sized SSD disk? What do you mean by properly sized? This one is too much or too little? - 120GB OCZ Vertex 3 MAX IOPS Sandforce Solid State Drive (Up to Sequential Read 550MB/s - Write 500MB/s SSD Serial-ATA III)

                                   

                                  I think that I won't be able to afford both this SSD and the 2nd Generation Intel® Core™ i7-2820QM, 2.3-3.4GHz, (32nm, 8MB L3 cache).

                                  Do you think it is better to buy the above mentioned SSD (or any other you would suggest) plus 2nd Generation Intel® Core™ i7-2720QM, 2.2-3.3GHz, (32nm, 6MB L3 cache) rather than the three HDDs and faster processor?

                                   

                                  Thank you very much for all the answers, I am really sorry I still have more questions... I am really sure that I need to learn very much .

                                  • 14. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                                    Scott Chichelli Level 3

                                    Do NOT buy any SSDs not worth it

                                    • 15. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                                      Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                      Frederic,

                                       

                                      Many Sandy Bridge computers/motherboards specify 32 GB maximum with four slots.  Some HM67 chipset based laptop systems are specifed to support four each  8 GB SODIMM modules (of course you need Win7 Pro OS)

                                       

                                      Scott, Do you at ADK ship your laptops to India?

                                      • 16. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                                        Frédéric Segard Level 2

                                        Frédéric Segard wrote:

                                         

                                        - An appropriately sized speedy SSD for you project/media drive. But a fast 7200RPM HDD would be just as good for H.264.

                                         

                                        You probably recieved the email notification before I got a chance to update my post. I'm also saying that a 7200RPM HDD for your media will be just as good for H.264. Especially if you don't intend on doing multiple layers of video often.

                                         

                                        That being said.  If the choice comes down to an SSD drive vs a higher CPU speed, my vote is for the higher CPU any day, no questions asked! Why? Main reason? H.264!!!! It needs CPU power to decode adequatly the heavy compression. Secondary reason? You can't upgrade a laptop CPU. But a HDD, yes!

                                         

                                        -----

                                         

                                        I'm not sure if the Seagate X hybrid HDD/SDD would be a bonus in this case. Media and/or Boot. Never tried them. Could be interresting though. I'd love to see if other have experiences with it!

                                        • 17. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                                          Frédéric Segard Level 2

                                          Bill,

                                           

                                          The specs of that laptop, does say Max. 16GB. But you are right in mplying it's not a Sandy Bridge limitation.

                                           

                                          > Expandable up to 16GB DDRIII 1866MHz w/ i7 8GB with i5 Processor

                                          • 18. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                                            Misha_cz Level 1

                                            Hello guys,

                                             

                                            thank you very much again, you really helped me to learn more about video editing laptops. I thought that everthing will be fine with the XoticPC but at the end they wanted nearly $500 for shipping plus I would have to pay the tax and duty here in India (including shipping) and that was way too much than my original calculations. I really don't want to pay so much money extra (especially when I can't be sure about how much money the custom officers would want at the end ), so I was looking for some other possibilities within Europe. At the end I will go with the same laptop but without the XoticPC's enhancements. I will buy it in my native country - Czech Republic so that billing and shipping might be done easily and my sister will bring it over to me in one week time. So that's in the end the fastest way..

                                             

                                            Here are the specifications

                                            MSI GT683R-261CS

                                            Intel Core i7 2630QM 2 GHz, 6 MB L3 Cache

                                            8 GB DDR3
                                            NVIDIA GeForce GTX560M 1,5 GB DDR5

                                            2x 750 GB 7 200 RPM

                                             

                                            I know that the configuration is much weaker in terms of CPU (the RAM I will upgrade to 16GB in near future) and has only two HDDs, but there is no way I could get a better CPU in the Czech Republic right now plus I am not sure I really need it for the amount of money it costs compared to this one. In the future I might add another HDD or SSD to the optical drive bay but for the time being I will use my external USB 3.0 HDD as the third drive. I might also replace the internal HDDs for SSDs once the price would drop down a bit more.

                                             

                                            So my last questions (I hope) is - do you think that I will be able to smoothly edit the h.264 footage in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 using this laptop? Would the CPU and GPU work together well so that I would be able to take advantage of the cuda and Mercury Playback Engine? As I said before, my projects are quite simple so I hope that this laptop would be able to handle them nicely.

                                             

                                            Thank you all very much for your help so far! Right now I am only sorry that I am not located in the US and can't afford the high end technology for the same price that I would pay for this laptop in Czech Rep.

                                            • 19. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                                              Frédéric Segard Level 2

                                              Misha_cz wrote:

                                               

                                              Here are the specifications

                                              MSI GT683R-261CS

                                              Intel Core i7 2630QM 2 GHz, 6 MB L3 Cache

                                              8 GB DDR3
                                              NVIDIA GeForce GTX560M 1,5 GB DDR5

                                              2x 750 GB 7 200 RPM

                                               

                                              So my last questions (I hope) is - do you think that I will be able to smoothly edit the h.264 footage in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 using this laptop? Would the CPU and GPU work together well so that I would be able to take advantage of the cuda and Mercury Playback Engine? As I said before, my projects are quite simple so I hope that this laptop would be able to handle them nicely.

                                               

                                              Hi Misha,

                                               

                                              Will this configuration work well with your H.264 workflow? It will work! Is it optimal? Not as much as a comparatively priced desktop!  But all in all, you will be able to easily playback a single layer of H.264 with effects, maybe two layers without a hitch. More then that, you'll see when you try it. But like you said, if you do simple things, it should be fine. Just remember to buy more RAM when you have the opportunity.

                                               

                                              Hey, worst case scenario, when you do produce a computationaly intensive edit above and beyond the laptop's processing power, you'll just have to wait for a render.

                                              • 20. Re: Suitable laptop for video editing
                                                Jcena6159

                                                I was discussing about which laptop to buy few days ago with my friends. through doing reserches online, I visited this forum site, and get the best aspects in order to buy a suitable laptop that i can use for video editing purposes. finally I decided to buy Dell Laptop and got it. I am very thankful to the team members who has guided me to get the best way to deal with Laptop price range in India.

                                                 

                                                Once again thaks to you all.