3 Replies Latest reply on Aug 5, 2011 5:11 PM by the_wine_snob

    Problem with imported jpegs and stop motion

    christine cc

      I'm pretty new to video editing and have dropped a major clanger.

       

      I am creating a stop motion film which I hope to output in HD - I'm in the UK so it's PAL.

       

      I have shot most of it on my Nikon camera which shoots at 2464px x 1632px which means I lose the top and bottom of the frames when converted to 1920 x 1080.

       

      I can live with this, but for some reason I am losing a large amount of the frames around the sides as well.

       

      So the images are being cropped too tightly.

       

      I'm not sure if I have altered a setting accidently but should premiere crop the images on default and if not how do I get back there please?

       

      One last issue if I may. I have shot in batches and for most of the film I want 10 photos to be displayed per second whilst one sequence needs more images -12 per second - to speed them up.

       

      How do I set up for different speeds in the same film please?

       

      Any help much appreciated.

        • 1. Re: Problem with imported jpegs and stop motion
          lasvideo Level 4

          "2464px x 1632px which means I lose the top and bottom of the frames when converted to 1920 x 1080."

           

          Hi Christine, Im no math genious but  if your image is width (side to side)  2464 and is placed in a sequence that is 1920, you are losing 544 pixels total. So that would explain why you are losing image on the sides of your animation.

           

          Now if you are importing individual jpegs and not a movie file. I think to scale things you might want to import everything, create a sequence that fits the format and size of your jpegs (Custom), then "Nest" the sequence you created in a standard HD size sequence and resize the nest as desired.

           

          I guess you could scale the nested sequence to fit the HD size exactly but that  will introduce distortion into it. Or you could scale the 2464 to fit  the 1920 and just get a little more black borders on the top and bottom.  That might be the best option. That letter box look is very acceptable  these days.

          • 2. Re: Problem with imported jpegs and stop motion
            joe bloe premiere Level 5
            I have shot most of it on my Nikon camera which shoots at 2464px x 1632px which means I lose the top and bottom of the frames when converted to 1920 x 1080.

            I would recommend creating a custom sequence setting that
            matches the native resolution of the images (2464px x 1632).

             

            In the New Sequence dialog, click on the Settings tab.
            Change the Editing Mode to Custom, and then you can
            change whatever parameters you like.
            If it's a setting you'll want to reuse, save it as a custom preset
            so you can go back to it quickly.

            plagiarised

             

            If your images are sequentially numbered, you can isolate and
            import a selected range of images and use the Interpret Footage
            dialog to set the desired frame rate for each individual sequence.

             

            Import numbered still-image sequences as video clips

             

            Modifying clip properties with Interpret Footage

            • 3. Re: Problem with imported jpegs and stop motion
              the_wine_snob Level 9

              Christine,

               

              Welcome to the forum.

               

              Though PrPro CS 5/5.5 does a good job of Scaling, there is still the matter of the overhead involved with Still Images, that are larger, than you need.

               

              Personally, I would use Photoshop to Scale all of your Stills, as you are using a bunch. You can easily write an Action to do almost everything automatically, and then use Joe's suggestion on Numbered Stills.

               

              Much of the success with stop-motion will be your Duration, and also your subject and your "vision." In very general terms, I usually go with 3 - 5 Frames for the Duration. In PrPro CS 5/5.5, you can change that Duration in the Project Panel, but I like to set the Stills Duration in Ediit>Preferences, before Import.

               

              For, say a 5 Frame Duration, I'd possibly add Cross-Dissolve Transitions of 4 Frames Duration.

               

              Good luck, and I think that when you do the initial Image manipulation in PS, and then Joe's suggestion, you will be happier.

               

              Oh, I forgot. This ARTICLE goes into more detail on Scaling in PS, and automating things. Overlook the intial numbers, as it was written back when SD material was the norm. You will Scale (and Crop) to an HD Frame Size.

               

              Hunt