24 Replies Latest reply on Aug 13, 2011 8:11 AM by tm6550

    Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing

    tm6550

      This newbie has created a front cover, back cover, and spline in Photoshop Elements with multiple layers consisting of a background image of a mountain, text, and on the front cover, an airplane. I've combined the three parts into a wraparound cover within a single indd file, which I've exported to PDF for upload to Amazon's CreateSpace (CS) for a print-on-demand book.

       

      CS instructions say to "flatten" the cover. I've researched the term and found forum discussions that mention "raster" and "vector" and the pros and cons of different options for preparing a layered image for printing. I'm aware of the cautions about flattening being an irreversible process, and to never do that to a master copy. Beyond that, to say I'm confused would be an understatement.

       

      I realize this is an InDesign forum, but I'm seeking advice on whether there are actions I should take in Elements before placing the three parts of the cover into the InDesign document for converting to PDF. For example, should I flatten them within Elements before placing them in the InDesign document, then convert to PDF? Or is it better to do that on the complete cover within InDesign?

       

      Any assistance on clearing up this fog would be appreciated.

        • 1. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

          In PDF flattening usually refers to transparency, not layers.Are you using any transparency or effects in ID, or are your images transparent?

           

          I've never seen any output from this print-on-demand equipment, but my guess is there's a really good chance that flattened transparency would show "stitching" artifacts in print as well as on the screen. They look like thin white lines around the transparent areas, and generally don't show on very high resolution output, as in lithography, but do tend to show at 600 dpi.

          • 2. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
            tm6550 Level 1

            Peter: Thank you for taking the time to offer assistance.

             

            I'm too new at this to say things in the clearest way, but to clarify, I have assumed that I needed to flatten the layered image to reduce file size bafore converting to PDF for upload to the print-on-demand site.

             

            Between the time I posted this and receiving your comment, however, I've read that conversion from either PSD or JPEG to PDF flattens the image automatically. And the advantage to doing that as opposed to flattening it within Elements is that it isn't permanent. You can save a PDF as JPEG or PSD and regain the ability to modify the image.

             

            Again, I'm flying blind here, and I hope someone wiill correct me if I'm wrong, but for now I'm planning to stick with my current method:

             

            1) Design each part of the cover in Elements

            2) Place them into the InDesign document to create the wraparound cover

            3) Export to PDF

            4) Upload to the print-on-demand site

             

            I hope it's not a breach of forum etiquette to leave this question as "not answered" for a bit to see if anyone will confirm or modify my understanding of this.

             

            Thanks again to all.

            • 3. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              OK, jpeg does not support transaprency or layers, so that's a non-issue. Resaving jpeg recompresses the file, though, so you lose more quality each timne you do it. You should not store files you want to continue to edit as jpeg, or if you save a jpeg, keep a tiff or preferably a .psd of the image as well.

               

              Once flattened, it's flattened. You can't go back and unflatten an image.

               

              Saving as PDF from Photoshop can be done in two ways, saving with or without retaining Photoshop editability. If you want to retain editability you won't be flattening a layered image. I don't use Elements so I don't know waht the options are there, but I suspect the same.

               

              Doing the imagery in Photoshop or Elements is the right place to work with raster assets, but you are best off doing typographic work in ID where you have infinitely more control, and you can for sure export a PDF that will leave your type or any other vector content as vectors.

               

              I'd love to hear an explanation from the printer on exactly what they mean by flattened. YOu really are far better off, if the system can handle it, to use live transparency (which requires Acrobat 5 or higher compatibility). You should also find out waht color space is used. If they want RGB you don't want to be converting to CMYK during export.

              • 4. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                tm6550 Level 1

                Thank you, Peter. I learned something new in every paragraph of your reply. These forums are a outstanding resource for us newbies.

                 

                I think the issue of saving and resaving into different formats is a non-player even without knowing about the problems (such as loss of resolution) that can occur. In all instances so far, I've always gone back to the original source to make changes and then convert again. If I convert to jpeg to send an image to someone for comment and end up changing it as a result of feedback, for example, I return to the psd for that.

                 

                Your comment ebout typographic work especially got my attention. I began this whole design-a-cover saga by venturing into PSE8 a few months before trying InDesign. My familiarity with the former led me to continue working with it for the title, author credit, and back cover copy because I didn't know how to use even a fraction of InDesign's capabilitites, like somthing so simple as adding styles to the text. With the complex mountain background on my cover, I had to find a way to keep the text from merging visually with it. Plain text just didn't hack it. I looked at InDesign's options and found nothing so effective as PSE8's "simple emboss." The letters really pop out with depth and even have a little dusting of white on the top and left along with a little shadow on the right and bottom.

                 

                I'm a total novice at this, but from what I can tell, the final pdf product shows no signs of degraded text from having used PSE8 for the typography. That said, I fully recognize that it may be due to my ot knowing what to look for. At this point, I can only hope that my readers won't know either!

                 

                When I finish here, I'm going to look up "live transparency." There is so much I don't know . . .

                 

                The cover specifications do call for RGB.

                 

                Thanks again, Peter. You've really helped me make a bit more sense of this.

                • 5. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                  Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                  InDesign has some, not all, of the same effects that you can do in Photoshop, including Bevel andEmboss, glows, and drop shadows. You'll find them under Object > Effects or by opeing the Effects panel (Window > Effects) where you can control whether the effect is applied to the entire object, the fill or stroke of the frame, or the text.

                   

                  Also I just want to be sure you understand that ID supports import of native .psd or .ai files as well as most of the formats you can export from either Photoshop ore Illustrator.

                  • 6. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                    Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                    Forgot to include the creen shot.

                     

                    Text Effects.png

                    • 7. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                      tm6550 Level 1

                      Peter:

                       

                      Wish I were writing my novel in Lorem Ipsum and I'd use the screen shot!

                       

                      I think what happened was a simple case of reverting to what I knew at the time. I remember considering the drop shadow and thought it might be too much for the cover, and don't think I noticed the bevel you applied. More to explore. Here's what I was trying to duplicate with InDesign:

                      LOREM IPSUM COVER.jpg

                      I feel as if I have a dedicated tutor, Peter.

                      • 8. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                        Derek Cross Level 6

                        Lynda.com has a very good tutorilal called "Designing Book Covers Hands-on Workshop" which covers using InDesign CS4 amd CS5.

                        http://www.lynda.com/Illustrator-CS4-tutorials/designing-book-covers-hands-on-workshop/538 50-2.html

                         

                        This is their course description:

                         

                        Join author Nigel French in Designing Book Covers Hands-On Workshop as he walks through several approaches to creating professional, engaging book covers using Adobe Creative Suite applications. This course covers document setup, composition and layout, illustration, typography essentials, and printing.

                        Topics include:
                        • Researching the design and brainstorming ideas
                        • Setting up a document in InDesign or Illustrator
                        • Choosing typefaces, colors, shapes, and imagery
                        • Hand-drawing type and using different type treatments
                        • Creating illustrations from scratch
                        • Using and adapting photographs for illustration
                        • Preparing the book covers for printing

                         

                        (I have no connection with the organisation.)

                         

                        Derek


                        • 9. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                          Have some fun. The basic difference between your cover and my sample is yours is over a photo (no problem) and I used a larger shadow.

                           

                          Here's a flattened PDF sample from ID with beveled text and shadow over a photo:

                          Stitching.png

                           

                          Do you see the thin white line under the word color? That's stitching, and it will print on low-res devices. For some reason Photoshop's text engine won't initialize for me, so I need to try a reboot before I can try to reproduce this in Photoshop and see if it also produces stitching. This is outside my normal design style, so I'm not sure, but I think if the Photoshop file is flattened before export (type gets rasterized) there would be no problem, not sure about exporting with live type though.

                           

                          But this is a cautionary example and you might find that if you are using type effects those really are better done in Photoshop. Not that a non-flattened PDF from ID does NOT show stitching and ordinarily would not be a problem for most printers, so you need more info from these folks.

                          • 10. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                            tm6550 Level 1

                            This is a combined reply with thanks to:

                             

                            DerekC1000: The tutorial looks like a fantastic way to learn and I'll check it out.

                             

                            Peter: I continue to be amazed and had no idea you could do anything like your "amazing color" sample. I love the way the text appears with so much depth. I cannot see the white line you're talking about, however.

                             

                            One of the most significant factors in my attempts to design my own cover is that I have more time to invest than discretionary funds. I'd love to hire a designer, and I have no illusions about being able to come even close to what a professional can do. But when considering the purpose of the cover, the reality is that it has a job to do, and if I can design one that doesn't present any obstacles to a potential buyer picking it up, I've at least achieved a practical objective.

                             

                            A couple of my writer friends have backgrounds in marketing, and they've helped me understand a little bit about how a cover should "hijack" (my word) the viewer's eyes. Typically seen first spline-out on a shelf, does the cover draw the buyer's hand to lift it off for a closer look? Does the front cover create any resonance that encourages the buyer to turn the book over and read the back cover copy? Does that result in the buyer opening the book and reading a sample so that the interior has a chance of enticing the buyer to pay for it?

                             

                            This may be off-topic a bit for this forum, but it relates directly to a novice like myself jumping headfirst into learning an application with so much capability. The amount of collective knowledge and experience of members willing to share is the key to me even trying it, and I am grateful for any and all advice.

                            • 11. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                              BobLevine MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                              Lynda.com rocks.

                               

                              Here's a link for one week trial: http://bit.ly/fcGpiI

                               

                              Bob

                              • 12. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                                I'm back from a reboot and walking the dog.

                                 

                                First, about the stitching. You have to look pretty hard to see it here on the forum. Make sure you click the image to magnify it as much as possible. Stitching is hairline thin, but will jump out of a dark background in print if it's there. I did confirm atha I can export essentially the same image from Photoshop (the effects controls are a bit more advanced and the defualts are different (that's a "Hard Chisel" bevel) so it isn't exact) and I can save as PDF/X-1a, which is a flattened format, but as I mentioned this does rasterize the type in Photoshop and flatten the layers, so you cannot do further editing -- save a layered copy first -- and it does not show stitching, so I guess maybe the rule of thumb would be if you must deliver a flat PDF, do any transparency-related work in Photoshop and flatten there, then add any new vector content or type that does not need effects or shadows in ID.

                                 

                                Second, ID is a HUGE program, and more complex than Photoshop in many ways. Even the engineers have specialties inside the program, and I doubt if there is anyone out there who has truly mastered every aspect, so don't fell chagrinned if it takes you some time to learn what you can do. Playing is one of the best things you can do, in my opinion, and these froums are a fabulous source of information. At least half of what I know I picked up by reading here what others before me asked or answered, and now I get the credit for being smart. If you have free time, browse the topics, see if you can figure out for yourself how to answer a question, or read what others suggest. And by all means continue to ask about things that are unclear. You won't find a better group of mentors for InDesing anywhere than right here.

                                • 13. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                  Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                                  Oops, forgot to tell you if you still don't see the stitching, let me know, and I'll send you the PDF to look at.

                                  • 14. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                    tm6550 Level 1

                                    Combined reply with thanks to Bob for the link to the lynda.com free trial and to Peter:

                                     

                                    I found the stitching on your amazing color "under the microscope," then put my front cover to the test by looking at the psd and pdf versions. The psd had none, which I gather is to be expected because stitching is a product of conversion/flattening. Then I saved it as a photoshop pdf and it had no stitching either. Then I zoomed way in on the indd wraparound cover and found none. Then on the pdf, and it was sans stitching as well.

                                     

                                    I've made no adjustments to the default pdf settings, which when I checked in the InDesign Adobe Presets Menu showed [High Quality Print]. On any menu that has things I can change, I've generally been accepting the defaults because I don't have the knowledge to know what I should change.

                                     

                                    This may mean that the cover file I've uploaded to the print-on-demand site will be rejected because it's too large, but I just looked at the info on the original indd file (3.1MB) and on the pdf file made from it (932KB), which indicates even to this novice that there's been some flattening or compressing or something of the sort going on.

                                     

                                    Does any of that sound promising, or am I doing a bit of wishful thinking?

                                    • 15. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                      Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                                      The High Quality Print preset uses Acrobat 5 compatibility, which supports live transparency, so the transparency is not flattened and there would be no stitiching problem in any application, including ID, but the PDF may not meet the requirements of the printer (though, frankly, I don't know why it wouldn't).

                                       

                                      Doo you have a link to the print preparation specs?

                                      • 16. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                        tm6550 Level 1

                                        Peter:

                                         

                                        I don't think you can access the information without having a CreateSpace account with Amazon.

                                         

                                        They would like you to use their professional services, of course, and they offer five (I think) levels of assistance/cost. You can download their templates and do it yourself, or begin with a blank page and build your own according to specifications for page size and trim size and spline width according to the kind of paper you want and how many pages there are in the book. RGB and CMYK profiles, or "untagged in a generic color space," are all okay. All images should be sized at 100%, flattened to one layer and placed in your native document at a resolution of at least 300 dpi. All fonts should be embedded in the pdf file. There is also a note that if during the upload process they determine that the cover is less than 300dpi, a notice to that effect will be provided and you can continue if you elect to accept that.

                                         

                                        My cover has been uploaded successfully, but I'm not certain that it is checked for compliance until the review process, which I have not yet initiated. I didn't "size the image at 100%" by selecting that on a menu command, for example, I just created the three images of the cover to the specifications for a book of my trim size and placed them within identically sized frames in the InDesign document. They appear to fit perfectly, so I'm assuming that this equates to being sized at 100%. When I print each of the sections separately on an 8.5"x11" piece of paper, trim and glue them together, I have what appears to be the cover for an 5.25"x8" trade paperback.

                                         

                                        I haven't taken any steps to "flatten" the cover image, nor have I "placed it in the native document." I followed their instructions to upload the interior and cover in two separate steps, and it may be that the book won't pass preview because the cover isn't placed within the document as well.

                                         

                                        I suppose I'll find out soon enough.

                                        • 17. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                                          I don't see anything there that says anything about flattening transparency, so I think that should be all right. Honestly, I don't know why you would need to flatten layers for images placed into an application like InDesign, but these may be more generic instructions.

                                           

                                          Do you understand bleed and did you allow for it on your cover?

                                          • 18. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                            tm6550 Level 1

                                            The print-on-demand site's instruction to flatten really has no direct relationship to InDesign, Peter. They don't say anything about what application you should use prior to creating the pdf, and that's what generated my original plea for help as to whether it would be best to flatten the individual images within PSE before placing them into InDesign, wait until they are combined and then do it, or if it is even necessary to do that at all.

                                             

                                            I've been doing some additional reading on the CreateSpace forum and found a couple of very detailed (translation: too detailed for me) discussions on the differences in the output based on how you tell Adobe to create the pdf. I also found the following buried in the Help section:

                                             

                                                              Check the PDF settings that will be used to create your PDF file. If available, select "PDF/X-1a," "High-Quality Print" or "Press Quality" from the list of presets. If your system allows, make sure the following settings are chosen. Any other settings should be left to default in most cases.

                                                              Fonts and images are embedded.

                                                              Bookmarks, annotations, and comments are disabled.

                                                              Document security (any type) is not used.

                                                              PDF/X format is used. PDF/X is preferred, but if you are submitting non-PDF/X files (for example, PDF/A), any comments, forms, or other non-printing objects could be removed during our review process.

                                                              Transparent objects are flattened.

                                                              Spreads and printer's marks are disabled.

                                                              Downsampling, or decreasing resolution, of images is disabled.

                                                              Bleeds are enabled (if applicable).

                                                              Click "Export" or "OK" in the export dialog box.

                                                              Once created, make sure to open the PDF file to see that it appears as you intended. Otherwise, make the necessary adjustments in the native document and re-create the PDF file.

                                             

                                            The mention of "High Quality Print" in the first line and the fact that it was InDesign's default setting for export left me with the impression that I didn't need to do anything other than export the cover and it would be in compliance with the requirements. Then when I read on the other forum about what each of the settings does to output, and all this discussion about which setting is best, I wasn't sure if the comment about flatttening applied to my output pdf or not.

                                             

                                            As for bleed, yes, and I hope my math is correct in calculating the spline width for cream b&w paper, 374 total pages, trim size of 5.25x8, and a bleed of .125" all the way around, which increases the InDesign document by .25" in width and height over the trim size. I fully expect to have to do all that again, but such is life in the fast lane.

                                            • 19. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                                              The main difference between High Quality Print and Press Quality is the former preserves colors, the latter converts everything to a single destination profile, either RGB or CMYK, that you choose (default being the document CMYK working space). In either case, it helps to know the correct output profiles, and for best results I would recommend setting the working spaces to those profiles, particularly the CMYK space. If the final destination is RGB, you might want to define an RGB Black swatch, as well.

                                               

                                              The Press Quality preset "preserves numbers" which means if the working space is different from the output space, you will get a certain amount of color shifting, but your solid 100% K black type will not convert to some 4-color mix and be hard to print (less of an issue, with digital printing than press). Both preserve transparency (good), and leave out color profiles becasue it is presumed at that point that the color numbers are correct for output so a profile is not required for further processing. If your files are in the right spaces, either one is fine.

                                               

                                              ID ALWAYS embeds font's unless they arre restricted, in which case you'll get a warning, and you should probably find a different font. Your images also will be embedded unless you "omit for OPI," which you most definitely should NOT do.

                                               

                                              The PDF/X thing is a little contradictory. If the accept HQ or Press, I think they are preferable to PDF/X-1a because they preserve transparency, and PDF/X-4, the new standard preserves colors as well as transparency, and includes all profiles becasue it is expected further color management is going to be done downstream, but they specifically asked that you don't include profiles.

                                               

                                              Downsampling of overly large images is NOT a problem, and all of the mentioned presets do it. Ignore the direction. Nothing will get downsampled below the 300 ppi threshhold. That doesn't mean though that you might not have scaled samething large enough that the effective resolution is less than 300 ppi. For POD I would probably not worry about anything higher than 200 ppi -- you aren't talking about hi-res printing.

                                               

                                              When setting up, the docuemtn size should, in all cases be the same as the trim size, and you add the bleed allowance under "more options" in the setup dialog. Check the box in the export dialog to "use Document Bleed Setteings." not taht since they don't want marks, your PDF will be larger than the trim size, but there will be no indication of wher the trim belongs. This is not really a problem. If you set up theis way, that information is embedded in the file for the RIP.

                                              • 20. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                                tm6550 Level 1

                                                I think I understand about a third of what you said in this last one, so it will take some study to absorb. Until then, I gather that I'm okay with selecting High Quality and don't need to do anything differently. 

                                                 

                                                The last paragraph is where I'll start, because I didn't do anything like that. Their instructions told how to calculate final trim size based on the width of the spline and then add for the bleed. I built the document to account for that, and assumed that I'd included the amount that will be trimmed off, making sure that nothing but background extended past the trim line. I may have some alterations to make.

                                                 

                                                Thanks again, Peter.

                                                • 21. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                                  Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                                                  tm6550 wrote:

                                                   

                                                  I think I understand about a third of what you said in this last one, so it will take some study to absorb. Until then, I gather that I'm okay with selecting High Quality and don't need to do anything differently. 

                                                   

                                                  The last paragraph is where I'll start, because I didn't do anything like that. Their instructions told how to calculate final trim size based on the width of the spline and then add for the bleed. I built the document to account for that, and assumed that I'd included the amount that will be trimmed off, making sure that nothing but background extended past the trim line. I may have some alterations to make.

                                                   

                                                  Thanks again, Peter.

                                                  HQ is PROBABLY OK, but you might see some color shifting. Color management is a huge, complex, and baffling topic poorly understood by many (most?) professional designers. Don't feel bad.  I think you mentioned they had a link for color profiles, did you ever go there to find out what there was?

                                                   

                                                  Your layout method will work, but it's not as easy to work with on your end. One of the big advantages, I think, of setting up at trim size is that you see the page border for the theoretical trimmed document, you have bleed guides for the art that needst to bleed, and you can preview and export PDF either with or without the bleed area included. This last poart makes my life a lot easier when sending proofs to clients, and it might make it easier for you to visualize the finshed cover, too, to see it without the parts that get trimmed off.

                                                   

                                                  Notice I said "theoretical" trim above. The whole reason for bleed is to accomdate minor shifting in the trim or print process. Your "safety zone" for critical content is actually inside the trim edge by the same amount as the bleed allowance -- if the page is trimmed offset, the amount added on one edge is subtacted from the opposite edge -- and most of the time you want to actually stay even further inside if having an element very close to the edge would look bad. With high quality printers this is usually moot -- misalignments don't happen, but take nothing for granted.

                                                  • 22. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                                    tm6550 Level 1

                                                    That explanation helps, and I'll be looking at this today, thanks.

                                                     

                                                    I don't specifically remember mentioning a required color profile, just the following quote from the instructions: "Any images on your book's cover may be tagged with your choice of CMYK or RGB profiles or left untagged in a generic color space."

                                                     

                                                    Now, about this bleeding cover . . .

                                                    • 23. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                                      Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)
                                                      "Any images on your book's cover may be tagged with your choice of CMYK or RGB profiles or left untagged in a generic color space."

                                                       

                                                      Talk about less than helpful information....

                                                       

                                                      Seems like this is in conflict, too with other previous information about NOT tagging the PDF with profiles.

                                                       

                                                      I don't expect you to totally understand this, but you can think of color management as being a uninversal translator, like C3PO from Star Wars. The "source profile" describes how the color numbers in the image are supposed to appear visually, the "destination profile" describes how a set of color numbers appears visually at output, and the Color Mangement Module translates from one to the other so they end up looking the same. Source profiles are often in "device independent" color spaces like sRGB or Adobe RGB, which should look the same on any calibrated monitor (if you don't have a calibrated and profiled monitor, this discussion if pretty much moot because you can't trust what you see), but pretty much all output spaces are "device dependent," or descriptive of a specific set of conditions, particularly for print. If either profile is inaccurate (i.e. it doesn't really describe the conditons for either the image capture/edit (source) or the ink/paper used in the print), the color you get will be wrong, maybe only a little, but wrong.

                                                       

                                                      Think of it like a regional dialect or accent as you move around the country. if you ask people to read a list of words (the source profile), they will pronunce them differently (the destination profile) depending on where they live or were brought up. In most cases you can still understand what htey are saying, but the inflection will be a little "off" from what you expect. The job of the CMM is to know how you expect each word to be pronounced, and how each person who reads it will actually pronounce it, and if the two ar not identical to write a new phonetic spelling for the reader so it ends up sounding the same. Substitute color, and the CMM knows how you think the color should look (source profile), how the output device thinks the colro will look (destination profile), and if they don't match the CMM will make a new set of color numbers to give to the output device that will produce, as nearly as possible, the colors that are described by your numbers in the source profile.

                                                       

                                                      Do you have a headache, yet?

                                                       

                                                      Bottom line? Don't expect a miracle in color matching, but grass will be "green" and roses "red" but not necessarilythe exact "green" or "red" you were looking for. This is mostly not an issue in the real world. Your readers never saw the original, and color is not absolute in any case -- change the lighting and the color changes, too -- your camera doesn't capture color the same way your eye does and is more sensitive to certain wavelengths, and you can "see" far more different colors than you can print with 4-color process inks.

                                                      • 24. Re: Need advice on "best" way to prepare book cover for printing
                                                        tm6550 Level 1

                                                        I've got another book in mind, called Spier's Migraine Headache Generators. It will be filled with the explanations I've copied and pasted into my InDesign Help file that I hold to my forehead hoping some of it will transfer by osmosis, if not by any other means.

                                                         

                                                        Now if I can just figure out a way to afford to keep learning this . . . (see my latest thread)