4 Replies Latest reply on Aug 18, 2011 12:12 PM by the_wine_snob

    How do I fuse audio files together?

    GORY Pumpkin

      Hey, I'm finishing up the editing for my full-length horror feature, and currently I'm putting in the sound effects and I was trying to figure out how can I fuse audio files together?

       

      Here's the thing, my video files are files I converted into AVIs from VOBs, only problem is that the audio disappeared from them, but my friend tried to load all my VOBs into AVIs for me since I did something wrong but when he converted them the video was gone but the audio was there...so I figured I'd just take the audio and put it in place.

       

      Right now I have to put in a sound effect of the guy screaming while gory sounds are playing in the background, then after that I have a chainsaw scene where a woman screams, a chainsaw blases, a mechanical laughter is heard, and gory sounds are playing all together.

       

      If you could help me figure out how to get the files to fuse together to play the sounds all together, knowing I have to change the volume for each one, that would be very much appreciated. Thanks!

       

      -Toby

       

       

        • 1. Re: How do I fuse audio files together?
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Well, you can mix the sounds right on the Premiere Elements timeline. That's essentially what a timeline is for.

           

          Or, if you want to mix all the sounds separately, you can do so with the free download Audacity.

           

          Is there something more you're trying to do?

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: How do I fuse audio files together?
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            Toby,

             

            Once you have your Auido Clips, where and how you want them on the Timeline, you can Export/Share, with Export Audio the only setting checked, i.e. Export Video will be unchecked. Then chose the setting to get a PCM/WAV (Uncompressed) 48KHz 16-bit mix-down Audio file. This can then be edited in another program, or can then be Imported into PrE, to replace the various individual Clips, if desired. This ARTICLE goes into more detail.

             

            Good luck, and happy editing

             

            Hunt

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: How do I fuse audio files together?
              GORY Pumpkin Level 1

              Thank you so much, I scrolled around and forgot there were more slots to fill with some audio...thank you so kindly...I forgot you could scroll up.

               

              THANK YOU SO MUCH!

              • 4. Re: How do I fuse audio files together?
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                Ah, those scroll bars. They don't stand out, as much, as I would like. I always overlook the ones in the Share Panel, though I have used them many times.

                 

                Unfortunately, PrE has chosen an arrangement, where Audio & Video Tracks are grouped. I like the PrPro layout, where all Video Tracks are above a "centerline" and all Audio Tracks are below that.

                 

                About the closest that one can come in PrE is to use Delete Unused Tracks, to remove empty Video Tracks, or to View Video Tracks (alone), or View Audio Tracks (alone). With a combo of those, one can customize the Timeline a bit.

                 

                When cleaned up, one can then Add Tracks, for any additional Audio Tracks necessary.

                 

                If one did ONLY the View Audio, they loose the ability to refer to the Video Track, and with SFX, that is necessary, at least for me.

                 

                I like to keep each type of Audio on its own Track. That makes actions, like applying Track Keyframes, or adjustments to JUST that Clip, or Clip type. If I have SFX, music, camera Audio, and other Audio sources, I will put many SFX on their own Audio Track, the camera Audio on another, and then the music one one, or more additional Audio Tracks. Not too long ago, I had one Project with about 10 separate SFX Audio Tracks, one for a "loon," one for "crickets," three for "frogs," one for "pond ambiance," and then two for music (as I was doing faux DD 5.1 SS in PrPro), with one from Music F (front) and Music R (rear).

                 

                Good luck, and happy editing,

                 

                Hunt

                1 person found this helpful