9 Replies Latest reply on Sep 7, 2011 11:06 AM by bob-hal

    audio not tracking with video

    bob-hal Level 1

      Howdy -

       

      I've got an .avi file 13.1GB with a 1920 x 1040 image, frame rate is 29.97, audio source format is 32000Hz 16 bit stereo, project audio format is 32000Hz 32 bit floating point stereo, avg. data rate is 2.1 mb/sec, pixel aspect ration is 1.0. (This info was pulled from PE9>File>Get Properties)

       

      When I edit the video in PE9, the video is all blurry and the audio sounds fine. I just burned a short DVD to see what it would look like, and the video is clear, but completely in a different spot than the audio. It is a power point presentation that was recorded in a .wmv format that I converted into the .avi.  I went through this before and was able to get a clear DVD by running it through MIcrosoft Expressions. Now that isn't working for me.

       

      Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

       

      Thanks,

      Penny

        • 1. Re: audio not tracking with video
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          Penny,

           

          It sounds like you have a multoi-step process: PowerPoint to WMV, converted to AVI, and then Imported into PrE.

           

          With all of those steps, it will take some major troubleshooting, to find out where the OOS issue is being introduced. It could be at any step along the way, and about the only way to track it down is to stop at each step, and test with a player, like VLC, to see how things work.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: audio not tracking with video
            Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

            I agree with Bill.

             

            What type of camcorder is this video coming from? It's best to use the video directly from the camcorder, if possible.

             

            If your video is from a non-camcorder source -- say FRAPS or other screen-recording software -- that could be the issue in itself. Sometimes these non-traditional  codecs don't digest well in Premiere Elements.

            • 3. Re: audio not tracking with video
              bob-hal Level 1

              Hi -

               

              Thanks for your responses. I have spent the past few days converting the files to get them so they looked ok in the VLC player, and managed that, but still can't seem to get a good DVD.

               

              It is a video created from a GoToWebinar online webinar.  The presentation was made in PowerPoint, so no other video involved.

               

              Their instructions say to run their wmv file through Microsoft Expressions Encoder to re-format it.  I did that and then converted it into an avi file using Prism Video File Converter.  The videos look fine when I view them in the VLC media player.  The .avi file is blurry when it plays in Premier Elements, although the video and audio seem to track together. But when I try to burn a DVD, the video and audio are way off.  The wmv files won't open at all.

               

              I'm pretty frustrated, and not at all that committed to doing it myself, if there is someone out there I could pay to do it. The edits are really minimal - just cutting a couple of seconds off of the beginning until it gets to the presentation.

               

              But, because it is so simple, it seems like I should be able to do it.

               

              I uploaded the files: http://www.how-to-quilt.com/articles/strip-piecing-webinar.php although when I try to play them, they crash ;-/

               

              Any clues?

               

              Thanks,

              Penny

              • 4. Re: audio not tracking with video
                Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                Which settings are you using for your output in Expressions Encoder?

                 

                There are thousands of types of AVIs, and only a few of them will give you good quality for editing.

                 

                Also, programs like GoToWebinar often don't produce good videos for editing to begin with -- and the Microsoft Media Encoder may just be taking your bad video and making it worse. (It doesn't matter how good the original video looks. It's about it being the right format and codec for video editing.) Converting it to a WMV before importing it into Premiere Elemetns, for instance, would be one of the most damaging and inefficient things you could do.

                 

                What are your output options from GoToWebinar? Is there a web page that lists them? (They general output seems to use a proprietary codec called G2M3, which isn't likely to be supported by Premiere Elements.)

                 

                Using the right output format, if one is available, could save you running the video through a converter, give you better quality AND save you a lot of headaches.

                 

                Though we are bucking the odds here, unfortunately. Software like this can often be used to create a record of your meeting for playback online -- but it often makes lousy source video for editing.

                • 5. Re: audio not tracking with video
                  bob-hal Level 1

                  The video - Mode CBR-1 pass, buffer window 5 seconds, frame rate - source fps; key frame interfal 5 seconds, bitrate 1045 Kpbl, size mode Quarter source (width 960, height 520)

                   

                  Audio - Mode CBR - 1pass, bitrate 96 KBps, channels stereo, sample rate 44.1 Kbps, bits per sample 16

                   

                  Hope that makes sense.

                   

                  The output option at G2W was to convert to a Windows Media Player file, although I read somewhere that it doesn't have time markers (if that makes sense).

                   

                  I tried the VC-1 Simple as the GoToWebinar people suggested, and it didn't make any difference.

                   

                  Maybe something I could change in there?

                   

                  Also, how about if I made it a video file playable on computer only - like a flash file, instead of DVD?

                   

                  Thanks,

                  Penny

                  • 6. Re: audio not tracking with video
                    Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                    It all depends on what output options are available from the original program.

                     

                    But, as I said, converting it through Expressions Media Encoder is most likely only going to make it HARDER for Premiere Elements to edit.

                    • 7. Re: audio not tracking with video
                      bob-hal Level 1

                      Thanks, Steve. Looks like it's time to punt.

                       

                      Penny

                       

                      -


                      Steve Grisetti <forums@adobe.com> wrote:

                      It all depends on what output options are available from the original program.

                       

                      But, as I said, converting it through Expressions Media Encoder is most likely only going to make it HARDER for Premiere Elements to edit.

                      >

                      • 8. Re: audio not tracking with video
                        Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                        Before you do, try editing your video with Windows MovieMaker. It's a long shot but it may go.

                         

                        At the very least, MovieMaker will very likely be able to edit the WMV files you've produced with Expressions.

                        • 9. Re: audio not tracking with video
                          bob-hal Level 1

                          OK - guess it's worth a shot. And, I guess I can burn it to a CD or something that people can play on their computer?  I'm trying to sell copies of the recorded webinar.

                           

                          Thanks,

                          Penny