6 Replies Latest reply on Sep 7, 2011 6:31 PM by jasonvp

    Picture-in-Picture: Switching Between the Two?

    jasonvp Level 3

      Hey gang -

       

      First a bit of background: my video editing is purely as a hobbyist and focused primarily on my race track activities.  I do a lot of in-car video when I'm at the track.  Each video is about 20 minutes long or so, depending on how long the track session goes.

       

      I'm considering buying a second camera and pointing it backwards to get the rear-view-mirror sort of effect.  Part of the idea is for amusement to watch how quickly the cars I pass shrink back behind me... :-)  So the idea was to make a PiP video with the rear-facing camera view perhaps 45% its normal size and in the lower right hand side of the main video.  I watched the online tutorials on that and it seems fairly easy to do (if not computationally expensive).  I even played around with it using two of my older track videos just to see how it works.  Easy stuff.

       

      OK, the question: is there any way to easily switch views?  In other words make the rear-view camera the primary and the front camera the PiP?  Is there a way to do that without cutting the two video streams and swapping them between V1 and V2 in the timeline?  Again, I'll have 2 20-minute video streams (and a separate audio stream).  Is there a way to do that transition while leaving the two streams intact?  Or do I have to cut?

       

      Sorry if I'm using the wrong terminology here.  Still new to this stuff. :-)

       

      Thanks!

       

      jas

        • 1. Re: Picture-in-Picture: Switching Between the Two?
          Colin Brougham Level 6

          It's called multicamera editing, and Premiere Pro does it (with up to four angles, anyway). Read more here: Multi‑camera sequences

          • 2. Re: Picture-in-Picture: Switching Between the Two?
            jasonvp Level 3

            Colin Brougham wrote:

             

            It's called multicamera editing, and Premiere Pro does it (with up to four angles, anyway). Read more here: Multi‑camera sequences

             

            Coooool.  Thanks Colin.  That gives me more to read and practice with.

             

            jas

            • 3. Re: Picture-in-Picture: Switching Between the Two?
              Colin Brougham Level 6

              You're welcome. If and when you get to that point of doing a two-camera edit, and you're a little lost at the process of how to set it up (the help is a little vague at parts), open up a new thread. The first time you set up an MC sequence, you'll wonder what the heck you're doing, but it will be cake after that.

               

              Multicams are fun... working on a two-camera edit and a five-camera edit right now

              • 4. Re: Picture-in-Picture: Switching Between the Two?
                jasonvp Level 3

                Colin Brougham wrote:

                 

                If and when you get to that point of doing a two-camera edit, and you're a little lost at the process of how to set it up (the help is a little vague at parts), open up a new thread. The first time you set up an MC sequence, you'll wonder what the heck you're doing, but it will be cake after that.

                Deal.  Does the rendering of MC sequences qualify as one of the things CUDA cores can help with?  Or is that purely a main CPU thing?

                 

                jas

                • 5. Re: Picture-in-Picture: Switching Between the Two?
                  Colin Brougham Level 6

                  Well, in general, it's actually more of disk thing, because you're playing multiple video streams simultaneously. Functionally, it's equivalent to creating a PIP with two or more video tracks visible. Of course, depending on the nature of the footage, e.g. AVCHD, it can become a very CPU-intensive process, as well.

                   

                  I'm not sure if hardware MPE/CUDA really has much influence on multicamera editing or not, to be perfectly honest. Theoretically, since a CUDA GPU handles things like scaling--and that's more-or-less what you're doing in the multicamera monitor--its conceivable that hardware MPE works there. It really all depends on whether that part of the application was written to take advantage of CUDA or not. One of the Adobe engineers who seems to work most closely on GPU acceleration sometimes pops into threads like this to clarify such questions--I don't know if anything definitive has ever been stated before.

                  • 6. Re: Picture-in-Picture: Switching Between the Two?
                    jasonvp Level 3

                    OK, easy stuff.  The multi-cam did precisely what I was after.  I used two completely different videos which can't really sync because they're two different track events.  I faked it and synced them anyway, then did the multi-cam edit.  Making a copy of the entire combined track and setting it in V2/A2, then PiP'ing V2 onto V1 did the trick.  And it's super-easy to switch back and forth between the two using the timeline and cuts.

                     

                    Thanks again Colin.  Now I'm just curious if hardware MPE will make any difference here...

                     

                    jas