9 Replies Latest reply on Mar 10, 2012 8:06 AM by RjL190365

    Will Premier Pro CS5.5 run on i5?

    KDSProductions Level 1

      Will Premier Pro CS 5.5 run on a PC running an i5 2400 Quad Core Processor?

       

      Adam

        • 1. Re: Will Premier Pro CS5.5 run on i5?
          Todd_Kopriva Level 8

          Yes, that processor meets the minimum system requirements.

           

          For more information, see this page and all that it points to:

          FAQ: What computer and components should I buy for Premiere Pro or After Effects?

          • 2. Re: Will Premier Pro CS5.5 run on i5?
            Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Adam, welcome to the forums

             

            Do not expect sparkling performance.  We do not have a Desktop i5-2400 tested for you to see how well it does but look at the Benchmark Results page of Premiere Pro BenchMark (PPBM5) you will see the ranked test results of 449 systems (as of this morning) then click on "Model CPU" tab  and click on the "i5 series".  You will see 14 i5 system results.  So expect your results to be somewhat below the 330th ranked i5-2500 unit.  This if you have an nVidia CUDA graphics card with 1 GB of Video RAM.  If you put the full complement (16 GB) of RAM it will help somewhat.  If you overclock it it will also improve your usability.  And lastly make sure you have at least two 7200 rpm disk drives for best performance.

             

            If you could step up to an i7 processor you then (typically) get hyperthreading which in the PC version of Premiere is much faster than your i5 unit

             

            Message was edited by: Bill Gehrke

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            • 3. Re: Will Premier Pro CS5.5 run on i5?
              Jim_Simon Level 8

              The i5 2400 seems to perform about the same as or slightly better than an i7 920, so that should give a baseline reference.

              • 4. Re: Will Premier Pro CS5.5 run on i5?
                Harm Millaard Level 7

                You are funny.

                 

                Must be the new Jive software.

                • 5. Re: Will Premier Pro CS5.5 run on i5?
                  Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  Jim, I sure do not know how you came up with that conclusion  the i5-2500 nonoverclocked has a total score of 647 and a typical i7-920 non-overclocked is 200-300 seconds less

                  • 6. Re: Will Premier Pro CS5.5 run on i5?
                    Jim_Simon Level 8

                    I sure do not know how you came up with that conclusion

                     

                    Properly conducted comparitive benchmarks.

                     

                    http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/desktop-cpu-charts-2010/benchmarks,112.html

                     

                    PPBM5 may be good for tuning a system, but as the testing parameters aren't controlled and contain so many variables, the results just aren't as useful when looking at how a particular CPU will perform.

                    • 7. Re: Will Premier Pro CS5.5 run on i5?
                      Harm Millaard Level 7

                      Unfortunately those

                       

                      Properly conducted comparitive benchmarks.

                       

                      are not conducted properly. Have you seen what they test, the source material, the duration, the workflow? Just look at the results of these 'properly conducted tests' that can not be replicated in real life. See where an AMD comes out. If this were correct, the best ranking AMD CPU, currently at rank # 207 in our test while heavily overclocked, would have been much higher. It should better my own 920 at rank #11 by a significant margin. Well, where are they?

                       

                      The whole Tomshardware testing is laughable when comparing PR results. They use crippled systems to start with, not enough RAM, not enough disks, and use unrealistic software tests, that only use very short duration AVCHD material, all with the same framerate, with extremely limited effects and only export to H.264, nothing more.

                       

                      PPBM5 may be good for tuning a system, but as the testing parameters aren't controlled and contain so many variables, the results just aren't as useful when looking at how a particular CPU will perform.

                       

                      I'll give you that the presentation of the results of Toms is easy to interpret, but what are you interpreting? You know nothing about the performance of PR other than that short duration simple test with a single video track, you don't know the amount of memory installed, the impact of the video card, the disk setup, etc.

                       

                      Our test is clearly more difficult to interpret, but gives much more information on the real life performance of PR in a variety of situations. People not interested in the intricacies of their setup and where they can eke the last ounce of performance out of that system are indeed better off with those Toms tests, because they can just glance over the graphs and draw their - often mistaken - conclusions in a matter of minutes. The PPBM5 test requires much more study, because of the uncontrolled parameters as you rightly state, but can offer much more valuable information.

                       

                      So I would rephrase your statement to:

                       

                      PPBM5 is good for tuning a system, but as the testing parameters aren't controlled and contain so many variables, the results are much more useful than Toms and harder to interpret when looking at how a particular CPU will perform.

                       

                      It is up to the user whether he wants to make that investment in study, ask our help in interpreting his/her results or prefers to glance over Toms results and draw often unfounded conclusions by only glancing at the graphs.

                      • 8. Re: Will Premier Pro CS5.5 run on i5?
                        RjL190365 Level 4

                        KDSProductions wrote:

                         

                        Will Premier Pro CS 5.5 run on a PC running an i5 2400 Quad Core Processor?

                         

                        Adam

                        Yes. However, don't expect great performance out of that system due to the i5-2400's lack of HyperThreading and the CPU's very limited overclockability. At its stock speeds, the i5-2400 falls below a stock-speed i7-920 when both systems are properly tuned. This is due to the fact that Premiere Pro CS5.5 scales very well with more CPU threads (the i5-2400 is a quad-core CPU that lacks Hyperthreading while desktop i7s are quad- or hexa-core with Hyperthreading, rendering the i5 somewhat crippled with more than one video track).

                         

                        And the truth is that any cheapo consumer editing program can perform exactly the same thing that Tom's Hardware does in testing with CS5.x. However, some of the consumer programs do not support frame rates higher than 30 fps, resulting in 50p or 60p video content dropping half the frames (which makes for an often choppy and stuttering mess).

                        • 9. Re: Will Premier Pro CS5.5 run on i5?
                          RjL190365 Level 4

                          I am revisiting this thread because I had posted PPBM5 results from my auxiliary i5-2400 PC.

                           

                          As Bill Gehrke stated, do not expect sparkling performance. Even overclocked to its maximum 3.6GHz and equipped with a GeForce GTX 560 GPU (with the CUDA hack, of course), my particular i5-2400 ranked 269th out of the current 767 systems in the PPBM5 results list. And at stock speeds with no RAID, it ranked 351st out of 767. The latter result puts it in the class of the best results from comparably equipped PCs with the slower of the first-generation i7 CPUs (such as an i7-920 or i7-930) running at their stock speeds, while the overclocked score is comparable to a typical result from a stock i7-950. (All results were when running CS5.5.)