5 Replies Latest reply on Sep 20, 2011 11:23 PM by Scott Falkner

    Mac to PC switch - heads up?

    nmw.nmw

      Ive been doing all my (print) work on a Mac, and have just started taking University Courses for Web Design. The courses at the University are on PC, so i bought a PC and the PC version of Design Suite.

       

      My Questions:

       

      How successful will I be opening and using my print documents from the past? Has anyone moved from Mac to PC - what problems will I run into?

       

      My .indd cs3 documents seem to load just fine into cs5.5. but...

       

      NONE of my fonts are installed on the pc, should I try to find the opentype equivalents?  What are my options? My fonts that are packaged with my indd documents will not load

       

      When it comes to printing/pdfing, do i run distiller the same way? print to a .ps file and distill? or is the PC different?

       

      Any ideas or suggestions are much appreciated!

       

      Thanks!!!!!

        • 1. Re: Mac to PC switch - heads up?
          Dov Isaacs Adobe Employee

          As you have found, the primary issue associated with cross-platform migration is that of fonts (“font” is a four letter word beginning with an “F”). One of the reasons for OpenType fonts is the elimination of the cross-platform issues.

           

          If you convert your documents to use the OpenType equivalents of your existing Macintosh Type 1 or TrueType fonts, understand that (1) you will need to go through the process of changing the font names and (2) you may find some layout shifts. At least in the case of Adobe's type library, we purposely did modify the font names for OpenType because of subtle differences between the Type 1 and OpenType versions of the fonts. For symbolic fonts, such as Zapf Dingbats, Carta, Sonata, and Symbol, the encoding of the OpenType fonts is Unicode and you may need to use the Glyphs Palette in InDesign to access characters in those fonts.

           

          In terms of creating PDF files, at Adobe we most strongly recommend use of PDF export from InDesign as opposed to creation of PDF via distillation of PostScript. The PostScript output by Adobe applications and print drivers is optimized for printing on PostScript printers, not for creation of optimal PDF. Furthermore, PDF via distillation of PostScript does not maintain the color management or any live transparency of your original InDesign document. Nonetheless, under Windows you can print directly to the Adobe PDF PostScript printer driver instance created when installing Acrobat to create PDF; you don't need to use any manual procedures such as you needed to do on the Macintosh (Apple eliminated our ability to have that Adobe PDF PostScript printer driver instance).

           

          Good luck in your migration. Although choice of platform is really a personal preference (sometimes a religious obligation for some), the fact is that Adobe applications run at least as well under Windows as they do under MacOS.

           

                    - Dov

          • 2. Re: Mac to PC switch - heads up?
            Scott Falkner Level 5

            The file formats are fully cross-platform compatible. InDesign files created on a Mac will open in Windows and vice versa so long as the version numbers match. The same goes for your graphics created using Illustrator, Acrobat, or Photoshop.

             

            Windows Truetype fonts work on a Mac. Opentype fonts are fully cross-platform. Macintsoh PostScript or dfont fonts will not work in Windows. Windows PostScript fonts won’t work on a Mac but can be installed in Users/[username]/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Fonts and will then work in Adobe CS applications, but not other programs. So where possible use Opentype .otf font files to ensure cross-platform compatibility and for some small level of future-proofing. If you substitute fonts, even from the same vendor (e.g. Adobe’s Opentype Helvetica for Adobe’s PostScript Helvetica) expect some text reflow. For long documents this can propagate and result is added pages, text missing due to overflow, or empty pages.

             

            You can use Distiller as you have before, with either drop folders, by dragging and dropping PS files to the Distiller icon, or opening PS or PRN files with Distiller. But you probably shouldn’t. Better is to simply export your PDFs straight from InDesign.

            • 3. Re: Mac to PC switch - heads up?
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              Fonts have been covered. The real difference you are going to have to get used to is the keyboard and to positions of the modifier keys.

              • 4. Re: Mac to PC switch - heads up?
                [Jongware] Most Valuable Participant

                .. but if you're a keyboard jockey (such as I am), you'll be delighted to find you can tab through each dialog to access all checkboxes, drop down lists, and radio buttons. No need to mouse around anymore!

                • 5. Re: Mac to PC switch - heads up?
                  Scott Falkner Level 5

                  [Jongware] wrote:

                   

                  .. but if you're a keyboard jockey (such as I am), you'll be delighted to find you can tab through each dialog to access all checkboxes, drop down lists, and radio buttons. No need to mouse around anymore!

                  This is not exclusive to Windows. Macs can do this as well.