3 Replies Latest reply on Oct 6, 2011 1:39 PM by Rick Gerard

    Export time lapse for Premiere

    lewisfilms Level 1

      (I'm a switcher from Final Cut Pro to AE/PrPRo, normally I would assemble timelapses in QT 7 pro as Prores then import and edit/"pan" in FCP.)

       

      I have shot a bunch of timelapses as jpegs.  I gather that I want to assemble the image sequence in After Effects and then export a video from AE to be imported into Premiere. 

       

      Qs:

       

      How would I assemble the timelapses in AE?

       

      How do I save them out of AE for use in Premiere?   (format, settings, etc..)

       

      I want the native resolution of the 18 megapixel image which is approx 5200x3500 px, not scaled down to 1080p, can Premiere work with that resolution?

       

       

      Thanks for your time.

        • 1. Re: Export time lapse for Premiere
          Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          There's no need to convert an image sequence to ProRez. Image sequences load just fine in After Effects, Premiere Pro, or Final Cut. I'm assuming that your time lapse is a sequentially numbered set of stills.

           

          Your best option would be to do a batch resize in Photoshop to something close to the final size the un-cropped image will be in your project. If you're planning to pan around then you should resize so that the image shouldn't be scaled too far up or down in either AE or Premiere Pro. It just takes a little planning to figure out the right size.

           

          Be sure to include an action in your batch process that cleans up the image for video. I typically apply a little Smart Sharpen after resizing to bring back some of the snap being careful not to go too far. I also sometimes do a little color correction in my action. On the other hand, if the images have a lot of horizontal and vertical detail like a shot of a cityscape with lots of buildings with lots of windows, I'll apply Dust and Scratches to soften the edges to eliminate the possibility of interference patterns in the fine detail. When you run the batch give your image sequence a name with a simple file name, a dash or underscore, and enough digits for the total number of frames (nightSky_0001.png) for example. That brings up one last thing. I almost always save my image sequences at a higher bit depth. I don't like manipulating 8 bit images any more.

           

          The reason for downsizing the images is to improve the look and to speed up rendering. AE and Premiere can easily handle the full resolution images but neither will do as good a job as a nicely written action in Photoshop.

           

          Check the preferences and see what frame rate your APP assigns as a default to image sequences. In AE it's 30. If you're project is something else (23.976 for example) then either change the setting in the preferences or change the file interpolation after the image sequence is imported.

           

          That shold about do it. Let us know if you have any other questions.

          • 2. Re: Export time lapse for Premiere
            lewisfilms Level 1

            Rick Gerard wrote:

             

            There's no need to convert an image sequence to ProRez. Image sequences load just fine in After Effects, Premiere Pro, or Final Cut.

             

            ------------------

             

            Your best option would be to do a batch resize in Photoshop to something close to the final size the un-cropped image will be in your project.

             

            ------------------

             

            The reason for downsizing the images is to improve the look and to speed up rendering. AE and Premiere can easily handle the full resolution images but neither will do as good a job as a nicely written action in Photoshop.

             

            --------------------

             

            Check the preferences and see what frame rate your APP assigns as a default to image sequences. In AE it's 30. If you're project is something else (23.976 for example) then either change the setting in the preferences or change the file interpolation after the image sequence is imported.

             

             

            Thanks for your reply Rick.

             

            I was thinking that just importing the jpegs as an image sequence would be more taxing on the computer than "baking" them down to a video file, even though that video file would be 5200x3500px. 

             

            Ideally, I would like to retain all the resolution of the images so I have more options in Premiere for doing pans/zooms.  If I do want to convert to a video file, what format would be appropriate? 

             

            Is there a way I could use Adobe Camera RAW in conjunction with After Effects to export a graded, full resolution video file of my image sequence for Premiere?

             

             

            If I use your workflow, could I bypass the Photoshop batch resize step and just import the image sequence into Premiere?  Is there an Interpret Footage dialog inside Premiere like in AE for me to set framerate to 23.976?

             

            Thanks again.

            • 3. Re: Export time lapse for Premiere
              Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              There's no advantage to converting an image sequence to video unless it's the same codec, compression, and frame rate you're using in Premiere Pro and it's a 'real time' codec designed for playback. ProRez will not support your 5200 X size. Most real time codecs are very picky when it comes to frame size. DV codecs for example, must be 720 X 480 or 720 X 564 (PAL). They can't be anything else.

               

              You don't have to resize, you're just going to have a bunch of pixels to recreate and the scaling will not be as good as it could be. If you keep the original frame size you'll be able to push in to about 1/3 or even 1/4 of the image without any trouble.

               

              The interpret footage dialogue is found by selecting the clip in the Project panel then clicking Clip>Modify>Interpret Footage from the menu or by a right click and following the same path.

               

              If you want to use camera raw then set up a batch or use Lightroom to process your image sequence before you import it. If you do that you must pick a key frame to adjust and then apply exactly the same settings to all of the images. If you don't you'll get terrible flutter in the images. It would be like shooting time lapse with auto exposure turned on. It just won't work.

               

              I hope this answers your questions.