6 Replies Latest reply on Oct 9, 2011 11:45 PM by Georgina L

    How do I import files encoded with FFV1 into Premier CS5?

    Georgina L

      Sorry if I get things a little mixed up here, but I'm still a relative editing newbie and some terms are confusing to me, but here goes!

       

      I've been given a bunch of short video clips that I need to import into Premier CS5. Trouble is, they have been (I am told) encoded with the FFV1 codec, and when I import them into Premier all I can see is the audio track and no video. Other than asking my friend to re-encode the files (over 200) in a different way, is there some workaround to get these files working in Premier?

       

      Thanks for reading.

        • 1. Re: How do I import files encoded with FFV1 into Premier CS5?
          John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Go to Google and enter...

           

          ffv1

           

          ...and read about the codec to see if there is something you can download and install to make it work with PPro

           

          Or, to find out if there is a (batch) conversion program to output a codec that is native to PPro

           

          Read http://help.adobe.com/en_US/premierepro/cs/using/WSd79b3ca3b623cac97fa024001235833a568-800 0.html to see what PPro will import, and tell your friend to start using one of those formats

           

          For regular (not HiDef) material, DV AVI 720x480 with 16bit 48khz sound is perfect

          • 2. Re: How do I import files encoded with FFV1 into Premier CS5?
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            It could be that all you need is to install the FFV1 CODEC, but having it installed on the system, might still not work in PrPro, but only for playback. See this ARTICLE on CODEC's in general. If PrPro cannot edit with it, then conversion is likely the best next step. Just use a conversion program, that does batch conversion.

             

            I noticed that the FFV1 CODEC is included in FFDShow. I strongly recommend against going that route, as FFDShow has caused many problems for a lot of Adobe users, and it tough to uninstall. I would go with that program, ONLY as a last resort.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: How do I import files encoded with FFV1 into Premier CS5?
              RDA972 Level 3

              "I would go with that program, ONLY as a last resort."

               

              I would clone my OS HDD prior to going down that potentially bumpy road if I were you.

              • 4. Re: How do I import files encoded with FFV1 into Premier CS5?
                Colin Brougham Level 6

                Don't do anything until you figure out what these clips actually are--and above all, do not install FFDshow. Ever. That's not a last resort; that's a don't-ever-resort.

                 

                To figure out what these are, grab MediaInfo and use it to analyze one of the clips. You can use the Text view to copy and paste a report here. I guess these could be FFV1, but that seems to be on the low end of likelihood. MediaInfo should be able to tell for sure, and it will also tell us the other relevant details of the clips so that a better workaround may be suggested.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: How do I import files encoded with FFV1 into Premier CS5?
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  Sounds like three votes against FFDShow.

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: How do I import files encoded with FFV1 into Premier CS5?
                    Georgina L Level 1

                    Thanks for all the useful info everyone. Here is the info that Mediainfo generated:

                     

                    General

                    Complete name                    : F:\rufus.avi

                    Format                           : AVI

                    Format/Info                      : Audio Video Interleave

                    File size                        : 194 MiB

                    Duration                         : 55s 798ms

                    Overall bit rate                 : 29.2 Mbps

                    Writing application              : Lavf52.23.1

                     

                    Video

                    ID                               : 0

                    Format                           : FFV1

                    Codec ID                         : FFV1

                    Duration                         : 55s 680ms

                    Bit rate                         : 29.1 Mbps

                    Width                            : 384 pixels

                    Height                           : 272 pixels

                    Display aspect ratio             : 1.412

                    Frame rate                       : 50.000 fps

                    Compression mode                 : Lossless

                    Bits/(Pixel*Frame)               : 5.580

                    Stream size                      : 193 MiB (99%)

                     

                    Audio

                    ID                               : 1

                    Format                           : MPEG Audio

                    Format version                   : Version 1

                    Format profile                   : Layer 3

                    Codec ID                         : 55

                    Codec ID/Hint                    : MP3

                    Duration                         : 55s 798ms

                    Bit rate mode                    : Constant

                    Bit rate                         : 128 Kbps

                    Channel(s)                       : 1 channel

                    Sampling rate                    : 44.1 KHz

                    Compression mode                 : Lossy

                    Stream size                      : 871 KiB (0%)

                    Alignment                        : Aligned on interleaves

                    Interleave, duration             : 26 ms (1.30 video frame)