7 Replies Latest reply on Oct 27, 2011 9:00 AM by PlesePrintJ

    Converting CMYK PDF in InDesign to only hold 2 PMS / Black.

    PlesePrintJ Level 1

      I've been given a PDF file to place in InDesign that has bleeds and needs to carry only three colors. PMS 185c, PMS 300c, and Black.

       

      However the original PDF file the client sent has a logo on the cover and back cover that holds CMYK and a third PMS color. It's a pink PMS color (that I've been able to remove from the swatch panel), however when told to replace the color with PMS185, it still remains pink.

       

      I've pulled the PDF file into Photoshop to fill the logo with the correct PMS 185 c red, however Photoshop auto converts the entire file into CMYK.

       

      Is there a way to export the InDesign document as a PDF to only carry the three colors (replacing any left over colors / CMYK to just the two Pantones and Black)?

       

      I've tried pulling the document into Illustrator as well, but it would require me to trace and redesign the logo in order to set it to PMS 185 c.

       

      I just need a quick way to format all the colors to just Black for text, then PMS 185c and PMS 300c for the remaining images.

        • 1. Re: Converting CMYK PDF in InDesign to only hold 2 PMS / Black.
          tman69 Level 3

          can't be done from within Indesign--fastest solution--request 'properly' made PDF rom client.

           

          next possibility--buy acrobat pro and enfocus pitstop plug in (about $1000)  then you can edit

          • 2. Re: Converting CMYK PDF in InDesign to only hold 2 PMS / Black.
            rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            I've pulled the PDF file into Photoshop to fill the logo with the correct PMS 185 c red, however Photoshop auto converts the entire file into CMYK.

             

            You need to create a spot channel in Photoshop for the red in the logo. It would look something like this where the image is only on the Black and 185 channel:

             

            Screen shot 2011-10-22 at 3.57.37 PM.png

             

            And not this which is probably what you have:

             

            Screen shot 2011-10-22 at 3.57.08 PM.png

             

            When you place the PSD with the spot channel in ID it will separate correctly like this:

             

            Screen shot 2011-10-22 at 4.05.23 PM.png

            • 3. Re: Converting CMYK PDF in InDesign to only hold 2 PMS / Black.
              jocstone_me Level 1

              try to open the pdf in illustrator? if the logo is vector-based, you can adjust all the colours there, save it, close it, done… with a bit of luck…

              • 4. Re: Converting CMYK PDF in InDesign to only hold 2 PMS / Black.
                Colin Flashman Adobe Community Professional

                I agree with tman69 in the first instance - supply correctly prepared PDFs. I say this because if one goes to lengths to correct the PDF and while it's out on proof the client has changes and resupplies the file, the OP will be doing the change all over again.

                 

                as the OP says, taking a PDF (which wasn't made in photoshop originally) into photoshop will render the artwork, so no go.

                 

                enfocus pitstop (an adobe acrobat pro plug-in) is a good option... if you have it... or know a friendly printer who does... or download the 30 day trial from enfocus itself.

                 

                it is possible to map colours using either acrobat or indesign's ink manager. however, this will typically map spots to either other spots; a process channel; or force to process. it's not possible through the ink manager to force a process color to a spot.

                • 5. Re: Converting CMYK PDF in InDesign to only hold 2 PMS / Black.
                  _300dpi_

                  tman69 is correct, Ideally it should be pushed back to the client to prevent further work in the future being submitted incorrectly. Although I understand this is not always possible, due to the artwork changing many different hands before it reaches you. So your end client just wants this dealt with.

                   

                  Enfocus Pitstop Pro, is an invaluable tool for editing PDF's. The version I run is a little clunky. However the later releases seem to be getting there and are certainly more intuitive. I'm not sure if there are any restrictions of what is accessible through the 'trial version though'

                   

                  I would definately stay clear of using photshop. Although possible if it started life as a vector then I would be eager to leave it as a vector.

                   

                  illustrator is another port of call, I guess this would depend how complex the image is and where the colour is applied.

                  You say you tried to port it into Illustrator but would have to retrace the logo. How so if it is a vector?

                   

                   

                  dpi

                  • 6. Re: Converting CMYK PDF in InDesign to only hold 2 PMS / Black.
                    Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                    cdflash wrote:

                     

                    it's not possible through the ink manager to force a process color to a spot.

                    It is possile through Acrobat preflight, though hardly intuitive, and I don't know that it would be possible to do shades of a spot for different CMYK mixes that are similar.

                     

                    There are other potential problems, too, like blends, when working with spot colors, and not all process art can be successfully converted as-is.

                    • 7. Re: Converting CMYK PDF in InDesign to only hold 2 PMS / Black.
                      PlesePrintJ Level 1

                      Thank you to everyone for your help. I'll try and get the original artwork from the client and if that doesn't work, I'll try taking some of these other routes.

                       

                      Thank you.