3 Replies Latest reply on Oct 22, 2011 9:48 PM by MaxFuhlendorf

    Problem with 10bit RGB video

    MaxFuhlendorf

      Hello.

       

      I'm having a problem with a project which was first edited with a low res proxy;

       

      The editor sent me the complete edit, and I switched the source file to the uncompressed file. They are both exactly the same duration, frame size, etc, but the proxy is a ProRes422 quicktime, and the master scan is a uncompressed 10bit RGB quicktime file (codec AJA Kona Uncompressed RGB Linear R10k).

       

      What I want to do is export the edited version of the movie in an uncompressed RGB 10 bit file, to use as a master for every format, including a possible DPX conversion for 35mm filmout. The master file is a 16mm film scan.

       

      The problem is, when I export the video as 10bit RGB, DPX, Cineon, etc, the image when rendered looks like this (it looks the same when paused inside premiere, but looks normal when I move the cursor or play it back without rendering, curiously):
      maxdepth.jpg

      The only thin I found that could be causing this is inside the clip properties: it shows a 24bit pixel depth (8bit/channel), when the correct (and verified via MediaInfo) pixel depth for this clip is 10bit/channel, saved as 32bitsPerPixel.

        • 1. Re: Problem with 10bit RGB video
          MaxFuhlendorf Level 1

          The frame looks like this when rendered as 8bit (with MAximum Bit Depth disabled in the sequence settings):
          Sequence 2.jpg

           

          And this is the Clip Properties info from Premiere CS5:

          File Path: M:\VELHARIA_Bruto\Fernandes16mm6-2-11.mov

          Type: QuickTime Movie

          File Size: 374,5 GB

          Image Size: 1920 x 1080

          Pixel Depth: 24

          Frame Rate: 23,976

          Total Duration: 00:33:40:03

          Average Data Rate: 189,7 MB / second

          Pixel Aspect Ratio: 1,0

           

           

          QuickTime Details:

          Movie contains 1 video track(s), 0 audio track(s) and 0 timecode track(s).

           

           

          Video:

          This movie appears to have DROPPED FRAMES.

          There are 48483 frames with a duration of 125/2997ths.

          There is 1 frame with a duration of 495/2997ths.

           

           

          Video track 1:

          Duration is 0:33:42:04

          Average frame rate is 23,98 fps

           

           

          Video track 1 contains 1 type(s) of video data:

           

           

          Video data block #1:

          Frame Size = 1920 x 1080

          Compressor = RGB 10-bit

          Quality = Most (5,00)

           

          Thanks in advance for any help!

          • 2. Re: Problem with 10bit RGB video
            Jim_Simon Level 8

            It is possible to have an 8 bit file in a 10 bit wrapper.  I wonder if that's what you have here. PP is reporting the correct data, and MediaInfo is reporting the wrapper.

             

            If that's accurate, the solution may well be to simply export out as 8 bit, since that's all you really have anyway.

            • 3. Re: Problem with 10bit RGB video
              MaxFuhlendorf Level 1

              That's would be possible, but I think it's not the case for two reasons. For one thing, I paid a very reputable company (pro8mm.com) for the film scan and paid extra to have a 10-bit RGB version delivered. Also, all players and MediaInfo report the codec as AJA 10Bit, and I don't see why the video would be captured in lower bit depth and then converted to 10-bit video (as most film scanners work in 10bit+ depths), except in the case ou foul play from the company who scanned the neg for me.

               

              Do you know any software that can conclusevely analyze a video and tell if it is 'real' 10 or 12bit or 8bit upconverted?

               

              Thanks!