8 Replies Latest reply on Nov 9, 2011 6:32 PM by atxplanetes

    Indesign to Photoshop font / compression problems

    atxplanetes

      (In case this needs to be pointed out, I'm using indesign CS4 and Photoshop CS5.)

       

      I'm using Indesign to create a "visual guide" for online purposes. The process itself is fine, but I begin to run into problems when I need to export my document. Since it's primarily aimed for online, I need it in jpeg. Indesign's jpeg exporting doesn't quite suit my needs as I don't need maximum quality and the "high" setting gives too many artifacts for my liking, and as far as I know there's no way to modify these settings (if there is though, I would love to know). I tried exporting a PDF, importing into Photoshop and exporting there, but the problem I run into is the fonts and text. In Indesign they look crisp and exactly how I want them to look, but in Photoshop they look very "light". I'm not sure what the word to use is here, but they seem to blend much more into the background.fasfa.png

      The left being Indesign's jpeg export, and the right being Photoshop's rendering of the PDF. Basically, I either want to modify Indesign's compression or fix how the fonts are rendered after importing into Photoshop. Any ideas?

        • 1. Re: Indesign to Photoshop font / compression problems
          Dov Isaacs Adobe Employee

          As an imaging format, JPEG was really designed for photographic images, not for content that is effectively sourced from text and vector. That's why you get significant imaging artifacts! TIFF or even PNG are much better for that purpose. Or why can't you use PDF for an online visual guide?

           

          That having been said, you may get better results by exporting PDF from InDesign and then opening that PDF in Photoshop which will give you many more options for image creation quality, antialiasing, smoothing, etc. to get the results you like best.

           

                    - Dov

          • 2. Re: Indesign to Photoshop font / compression problems
            atxplanetes Level 1

            you may get better results by exporting PDF from InDesign and then opening that PDF in Photoshop which will give you many more options for image creation quality, antialiasing, smoothing, etc. to get the results you like best.

             

            This is what I've been trying, but the problem is that the text becomes like how it is on the right image when I import it into PS. I can't use pdf / png for this project as it needs to be easily uploaded anywhere and the filesize needs to be relatively low, and this also includes a fair amount of raster graphics.

            • 3. Re: Indesign to Photoshop font / compression problems
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              What settings are you using when you open the PDF in Photoshop? I'd guess that's where the problem is.

              • 4. Re: Indesign to Photoshop font / compression problems
                atxplanetes Level 1

                Mostly defaults, only changing the resolution / size. Actually, I'm pretty sure this is where the problem is. It seems that at fairly high res (300) the text looks fine, but when it gets resized to around where I need it to be in PS (~80-90) it turns to how it is in my image. When I export with the same res in ID though, it turns out fine.

                • 5. Re: Indesign to Photoshop font / compression problems
                  mckayk_777 Level 2

                  Here is a case for outlining fonts ... maybe!

                   

                  If you outline fonts they loss there hinting but this does have one advantage of when you output it as a pdf then open in photoshop they will be just that little more cleaner looking.

                  Also you could look at the weight of the font you are using in a full reversal maybe a medium or bold font face would make it more readable.

                  • 6. Re: Indesign to Photoshop font / compression problems
                    atxplanetes Level 1

                    Yeah, I tried changing the font to a bold and it looks much clearer. It's not quite the same as the original, but it's acceptable and for now looks like the only option I have anyways.

                    • 7. Re: Indesign to Photoshop font / compression problems
                      Joel Cherney Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      I almost never use Photoshop, but on a few occasions I have been asked to prepare jpegs of complex script text (like, say, Burmese or Khmer) for posting online, and in those scripts the fine details are more important for the reader than they would be in English. And, like you, I had problems getting it to be legible at the screen PPIs of 72 to 96. Because I was actually maniuplating the type in Photoshop, I noticed that it gave me a few options about exactly how I wanted the type to be rasterized - if you key some text directly into Photoshop, you'll see that you can choose among a few different methods of anti-aliasing your type ("crisp," "sharp," "strong," etc).

                       

                      The reason I point this out is that, in order to get low-point-size type to render well in onscreen raster formats like JPEG at screen resolutions, you might be using the wrong tool. You might need Photoshop-level control of type rasterization that you cannot achieve by laying out in ID, exporting PDF, and rasterizing said PDF in Photoshop. If there's a way to do that at the PDF-import-into-PS stage, I don't know about it. I wound up doing my entire layout in PS (and recreating that entire layout in ID for print), because my gigantic list of three-line translations in twenty languages required different anti-aliasing settings for pretty much each line of type in order to maximize legibility at screen resolution.

                       

                      By setting your type in boldface, you've given the rasterization engine more pixels to work with, so it can anti-alias the type with better one-shot results. I think you're right about that being your best option, but if you have to do one of these projects again in the future, think hard about just setting the type in an app that will give you the kind of control you'd need over rasterization of type in order to make it easily readable onscreen.

                      • 8. Re: Indesign to Photoshop font / compression problems
                        atxplanetes Level 1

                        You're definitely right about that. I've done a few projects like these in the past, but exclusively used PS. I decided to use ID this time because I felt some aspects were a bit clunky and my fairly old computer doesn't take very well to the constant moving of groups that I had to do in PS; after I got the hang of it, working in ID was a much smoother process (plus things like distributive spacing have been absolute godsends) until I hit the very end / the other half of the project.