5 Replies Latest reply on Nov 18, 2011 6:37 AM by the_wine_snob

    Change video resolution and get it to be full screen? How..?

    goodiegood

      Ok, so i got this small video clip i want to be in 720p. The "problem" is that its current video/image size is 640x480, and it is black on its left and right side. HOW do i edit the video so it gets full screened (and thereby stretched too) and in 1280x720 size? Like, when i play the video in media player and full screen it, it will be full screened WITHOUT those black tiles on the right and left side?

        • 1. Re: Change video resolution and get it to be full screen? How..?
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          You do realize that in order to blow up a 4:3 picture to fill a 16:9 frame, you'll lose about 10% of the top of bottom, don't you?

           

          Is that what you intend to do?

           

          Also, blowing a 640x480 image to 1280x720 is going to over-rez the image. It will look blurry and pixelated since you're trying to force it to more than double it's size. Is that what you intend to do?

           

          Why not match your project settings to your video specs so that it fits perfectly in the frame, as the program is designed to do?

          • 2. Re: Change video resolution and get it to be full screen? How..?
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            To up-rez SD to HD, you might want to look into a program, like Red Giant's Instant HD. Do not know if it interfaces with PrE, but their page should tell you.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 3. Re: Change video resolution and get it to be full screen? How..?
              goodiegood Level 1

              Steve : What preference would that be then? I found a preference under PAL 640x480, but when i transferred my project to the timeline, the picture is all shivering/shaky. Why's that..?

               

              Bill: Will try it out, yes. Thank you.

               

              But does either of you know the answer to my other question about the fullscreen? Like, when i go into fullscreen in my media player, there should not be any black lines on the left or right. I see many tv-series that works like this. When I watch them in windowed, there are no lines and the same when i go into fullscreen mode. How can i do that for my videos?

              • 4. Re: Change video resolution and get it to be full screen? How..?
                nealeh Level 5

                goodiegood wrote:

                 

                But does either of you know the answer to my other question about the fullscreen? Like, when i go into fullscreen in my media player, there should not be any black lines on the left or right. I see many tv-series that works like this

                 

                It's all in the maths. Your monitor Aspect Ratio is 1280 ÷ 720 = 1.78:1 (the norm for most commercial DVD's) also known as 16:9. Your video aspect Ratio is 640 ÷ 480  = 1.33 (the norm for traditional TV screens) also known as 4:3.

                 

                If you have a 'semi-intelligent' modern widescreen TV you will often find that 4:3 programs look distorted because your TV has stretched the image to ensure no black bars top and bottom. You then have to manually switch, with your remote, the aspect ratio to 4:3 to make the image look normal - but this then leaves black lines left and right.

                 

                But the entertainment companies know that consumers want shows that fill the screen without black bars. To do this for older shows they artificially zoom the original to take only a portion of it. But they take that portion in a 16:9 ratio. It looks good on TV BUT, and a big BUT at that, you have lost some of the original image. They are also doing this with feature films.

                 

                Two examples that arouse my ire:

                • 'The Wizard of Oz'. Originally filmed in 4:3 (most films before, around 1957, were). But go to any video store and you can buy a widescreen version. But there never was a widescreen version of that film. All they've done is cut a 16:9 segment out of each frame and, figuratively, thrown the rest away.
                • 'Original Star Trek'. You can buy this in widescreen, or watch the TV widescreen version. But there never was a widescreen version - they are cropping it to 16:9 and throwing the rest away.

                 

                You can usually tell if a film/show has been cropped: there will be many examples (frequently of close ups on peoples faces) where the top or bottom of their heads don't show.

                 

                So to (finally) answer your question: to Share your video in a widescreen format you must crop your clips to a 16:9 frame - job done.

                 

                Cheers,
                --
                Neale
                Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                • 5. Re: Change video resolution and get it to be full screen? How..?
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  And, with many Hollywood productions, the opposite was true, when the TV edited versions came out. Say the original was shot in Panavision for theatrical release. The Aspect Ratio was 2.35:1 (Super Panavision, and some others, were even wider), but TV's were only 4:3 back then. The choices available were to keep a scene in the 2.35:1 Aspect Ratio, and have black bars above and below that image, or to crop off one, or both sides of the wide image, using only a 4:3 segment from inside of it. Usually, the former was used for openings, and then credits, and a crop of a 4:3 section was used for the rest. If one knew the film, it was usually easy to see, in things like two-shots, which, when edited for TV was a one-shot of the speaker, and then a cut to another one-shot, when the other character spoke. In many cases, there was a message that the film had been edited to fit TV screens.

                   

                  Been going on for a very long time, in one form, or another.

                   

                  Hunt