10 Replies Latest reply on Dec 7, 2011 9:26 PM by Keith_Clark

    How to do frame by frame image restoration?

    felinedrive

      I have a short silent movie (a .mov file) that was created from an old 8mm original film. I can open the file with Premire Pro and can view it frame by frame.  I was wondering if it is somehow possible to do a frame-by-frame restoration of this movie (such as eliminating random spots and occasional scratches), preferably with Photoshop (that has many nice image restoration tools) without losing any of the movie's original resolution?  I would welcome any ideas on how this might be accomplished? Thanks.

        • 1. Re: How to do frame by frame image restoration?
          Jim_Simon Level 8

          Export the piece as a series of lossless stills - PNG, Targa, TIFF.  Each can then be opened in PS for individual restoration.

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          • 2. Re: How to do frame by frame image restoration?
            Evil Edison Level 1

            You can load a quicktime movie into Photoshop.  Under "Window" click on Animation.  This will pull up a timeline under your image.  Now you can step through and edit frame by frame.

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            • 3. Re: How to do frame by frame image restoration?
              felinedrive Level 1

              Thanks! What would be the best way to preserve all the original characteristics of the movie (frame rate, etc.) if I were to do that in Photoshop?

              • 4. Re: How to do frame by frame image restoration?
                felinedrive Level 1

                Thanks, Jim!  Suppose I didn't want to restore each and every frame.  What might be the best way of importing and replacing individual frames (or series of frames) in Premiere?

                • 5. Re: How to do frame by frame image restoration?
                  Evil Edison Level 1

                  When you're finished editing go to File-->Export-->Render Video.  Once the window pops up you can adjust your settings as necessary ("settings" button is next to Quicktime export).

                  • 6. Re: How to do frame by frame image restoration?
                    davidbeisner2010 Level 3

                    If you're not going to do each and every frame in Photoshop, I'd recommend importing the whole thing to Photoshop. If you prefer to export in Premiere (with Premiere's better export settings), then my recommendation would be to follow these steps:

                     

                    1. Export the movie as a series of TIFFs as Jim suggested
                    2. Import that series of TIFFs back into Premiere, and lay them to a timeline
                    3. Step through the timeline one frame at a time, and when you get to a frame you want to adjust, right click on the clip and select "Edit in Adobe Photoshop." That will automatically open that frame in Photoshop.
                    4. Make your edits, and save
                    5. When you tab back over to Premiere, you'll find that the magic of Adobe has automatically updated that particular frame to the edited version. Voila, the best image editing software, and the best video editing software work hand in hand...
                    • 7. Re: How to do frame by frame image restoration?
                      Jim_Simon Level 8

                      Suppose I didn't want to restore each and every frame.

                       

                      So only fix the ones you want to.  When you're done, the now corrected still images can be reimported into Premiere Pro as a single clip using the Numbered Stills option.  (The Help file will guide you here.)

                      • 8. Re: How to do frame by frame image restoration?
                        felinedrive Level 1

                        Thanks so much Jim, Evil, and David -- you each had great suggestions that I think have put me on the right track. Although the approach of editing directly in Photoshop seems like the easiest (and therefore best) solution for me, I will also try the exporting, editing, and importing of the numbered stills approach with Premiere as well. 

                        • 9. Re: How to do frame by frame image restoration?
                          Keith_Clark Level 2

                          davidbeisner2010 wrote:

                           

                          you'll find that the magic of Adobe

                          i love the magic of adobe

                          • 10. Re: How to do frame by frame image restoration?
                            Keith_Clark Level 2

                            felinedrive wrote:

                             

                            Thanks so much Jim, Evil, and David -- you each had great suggestions that I think have put me on the right track. Although the approach of editing directly in Photoshop seems like the easiest (and therefore best) solution for me, I will also try the exporting, editing, and importing of the numbered stills approach with Premiere as well. 

                            i've done both methods, and depending on what you need, one could work better....

                             

                            i had a 7 second sequence that had several 3d rendered objects that intertwined.... i had to get rid of 1 of those objects, and so i exported that sequence as a tiff sequence and just went frame by frame in photoshop doing it. but i was doing every single frame.

                             

                            another time i had a video that had like what you were talking about some roughness throughout but not constant. that time i followed david's advice and it was very quick and effecient for that particular sequence.... you may prefer his method better for this situation....

                             

                            never worked with "film" yet, so i dunno if they have it available... but i wonder if there would be any plugins that may help remove like holes and whatnot? i dunno.... i do know that Photoshop CS5's content aware healing will proabbly do WONDERS to fix film holes and stuff.