4 Replies Latest reply on Dec 11, 2011 7:30 AM by nealeh

    Premiere Elements 9 on Mac - project size limitations?

    Stevenmac01

      About a year ago I purchased Adobe Premiere Elements 9 with a view to self editing of underwater video projects.  At about the same time I purchased a Sony Handycam HDRCX 700V video recorder.  This is HD video and seemed to be the way to go.

      I quickly realised that the laptop computer I was planning to use just did not have enough grunt to deal with the high defination video.

      So recently I went and purchased the highest specification desktop Mac machine I could lay my hands on.  Apple iMac 27 inch i5 3.1GHz QC, 4GB RAM, 1TB hard drive fully expecting my problems to be over.

       

      I have now started putting together a sizeable project of video footage taken on a Red Sea scuba diving trip.  I have the clips all in the timeline, cut down and sequenced but want to start the actual editing process with respect to transitions, video clip effects, audio etc.

       

      The new computer is now starting to fall down.  While the computer itself remains standing the Adobe PE 9 software keeps crashing.  When trying to add a second piece of video into a second timeline (I want to crop and have them play at the same time) the software crashes.

       

      My question is what the practical limitation is for a size of a project?  I am hoping to end off with something around 60 minutes but it would appear as if the software (together with the computer) is not capable of handling this.  Any comments?

       

      I have checked to see whether all the Mac software is up to date (yes it is) and all the PE9 software is up to date (yes it is).

       

      Are the specifications good enough?  What more can I do?

      Any help will be most appreciated.

       

      Kind regards

       

      Stevenmac

        • 1. Re: Premiere Elements 9 on Mac - project size limitations?
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Your camcorder shoots in a variety of formats, and not all of these formats are supported by Premiere Elements.

           

          So first you must ensure that you do not shoot in 60p! Loading 60p high-def video into Premiere Elements can cause all sorts of problems. Shoot video you plan to edit in Premiere Elements in 60i and 30i only.

           

          Beyond that, you can shoot in 1920x1080 AVCHD or 1440x1080 AVCHD. Despite these numbers, these two formats are the same essential resolution! The latter just uses more traditional TV pixels.

           

          But whatever you shoot, you MUST ensure that your Premiere Elements project is set up to handle that footage! So whatever you're shooting, when you start your Premiere Elements project, select the AVCHD or Full AVCHD setting that matches your video specs. Then attach your camcorder to your computer and use Premiere Elements Get Media/From Flip, AVCHD and Hard Disk Camcorder to import the video from the camcorder to your computer.

           

          If your project specs match your source video, you should not see red lines above the clips on your timeline until you add effects to them. Is that the case in your project? When they match, you should have excellent performance.

           

          Parts 1 and 2 of my free 8 part Basic Training tutorials on Premiere Elements support site Muvipix.com will show you how to set up a project and import AVCHD footage.

          http://forums.adobe.com/thread/537685

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Premiere Elements 9 on Mac - project size limitations?
            Stevenmac01 Level 1

            Hi Steve

            Thanks for the information.  Your site and replies have helped and I find your work really useful.  I have put many hours into PE9 and I really want to get the software to work.  Your answers while helpful (and I have now gone through your "free" video tutorials) lead to further questions.

             

            I did find that my video recorder was shooting in 60p so I have now changed this to 60i.  Trying out some test pieces I am now seemingly unable to select the correct project presets for a new PE project and when I want to add my new test piece into a new project I get a comment along the lines of the project presets do not match and do you want to change the presets.  I answer yes and when eventually I can get a clip onto the timeline it still has a red line above it!  I have tried several presets without success.  I need to point out though that I am importing the clips from an external hard drive in the m2ts format.  Living in South Africa I have to select the PAL format.  Any ideas?

             

            The other dilemma I now have is with video recorded in the 60p format which is where I want to put together my new project.  What software would you recommend for this?  Can I convert this footage and then edit in PE9?

             

            Do you have an article which explains the various ins and outs of the different formats?

             

            Your help is really appreciated.

             

            Regards

             

            Steven

            • 3. Re: Premiere Elements 9 on Mac - project size limitations?
              Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

              If you want to edit your 60p footage, you will need to upgrade to professional software. Premiere Pro CS5 can be pretty pricey, so Vegas Pro (at about $600) is an alternative.

               

              This is the unfortunate nature of using a pro-style camcorder with a consumer camcorder editing program. Sorry.

               

              I have no idea why your 60i footage isn't working in Premiere Elements. Try opening a clip in G Spot and seeing what the specs are (frame rate, dimensions, codec) for this footage.

              http://www.headbands.com/gspot/

              • 4. Re: Premiere Elements 9 on Mac - project size limitations?
                nealeh Level 5

                I use Aimersoft Video Pro. It allows you to change the frame rate (although I've never needed to do so, and can't comment on how well or badly it does). They do have a trial version you could experiment with.

                 

                Cheers,
                --
                Neale
                Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children