2 Replies Latest reply on Dec 13, 2011 9:34 PM by adninjastrator

    Project for TV monitor

    Tony Heagren Level 1

      Hi all,

       

      I've been asked to build a project that will show on TV monitors.

      They are large, wide screen monitors (720dpi) but not new and not hugh difinition.

      Anyone have any ideas what stage size / dimensions / ratio I should start with ??

       

      Bext wishes

      Tony

        • 1. Re: Project for TV monitor
          EvilBartek

          Ermm... id say 32 or 36 six inch would be best but in flash that would be huge so divide the inches by 4. So 32 is 7 and 36 is 8. Ratio: On my tv i have an option between 4:3 and 16:9 so i dunno. But i cant conver the ratio down. Dimensions: Hmmm the border should be like 1.7 inches so divide that by 4 itll be 0.425 . I don't know if i got the question right... Nevermind...

          • 2. Re: Project for TV monitor
            adninjastrator Level 4

            1280 x 720

            Here is why I say that:

            You say the monitors are wide screen... meaning they are 16:9 aspect ratio.. and you say they are 720dpi...

            what you probably mean is that the monitors are 720p (720 horizontal lines of resolution, progressive scan).

            I've done a number of Flash video/photo slideshows for 42" TV monitors and used that resolution... things mostly worked fine, but sometimes... depending on the monitor, off by a couple pixels on sides or top... so to make sure that the display was always 100%, I used "exactfit" as the "scale" param... in case your display is off by a few pixels here or there.

            For more info:

            http://tv.about.com/od/hdtv/a/whatisHDTV.htm

            scaling:

            Here are examples of different scaling parameters available in the Publish settings. You can also add these parameters directly in the html (<param name="scale" value="noscale"). All the examples replace the actual Flash dimensions with 100% for both width and height (width="100%" height="100%"). These examples use the old <object> and <embed> to illustrate the different ways to scale Flash. Once you understand how it works I’d recommend that you use swfobject to place the Flash in your final project.

            View the source code for each page to see the full code.

             

            http://www.cidigitalmedia.com/tutorials/scale/exact_fit.html

             

            "exactFit" scales the file to fit exactly within the confines of the screen, irregardless if the movie becomes consequently distorted. The original aspect ratio is not maintained. So round things are not round and squares are not square.

             

            http://www.cidigitalmedia.com/tutorials/scale/noScale.html

             

            "noScale" is the default setting, and causes the movie to be displayed at the originally designed dimensions.

            http://www.cidigitalmedia.com/tutorials/scale/no_border.html

             

            "noBorder" causes the movie to be scaled to what ever dimensions are needed to have no border surrounding the movie within the player, which consequently could result in some of the movie being cut off from view. In other words, the movie will maintain the original aspect ratio and will fill the screen completely. But if the movie has to be streched wider to fill both sides of the screen, it will also stretch taller, but then some of the top and the bottom of the movie may be cut off from view.

             

            http://www.cidigitalmedia.com/tutorials/scale/show_all.html

             

            "showAll" scales the movie to the size of the screen (which could cause pixelation if the file contains raster information), the difference between showAll and exactFit is that showAll mantains initial movie size proportions. Because it maintains the original aspect ratio, there can be space to the sides or the top and bottom. But everything always shows and they are not distorted. But notice the photo in the center, it becomes pixilated at larger screen resolutions.

            The trickiest part of trying to go full screen is that it’s difficult to make the Flash wider without making it taller also, that is, to maintain the correct proportions or aspect ratio of everything on the stage. These methods are just simple scaling accomplished with html. There are also methods to dynamically scale the stage and it’s elements using Actionscript… but that’s a much more complex undertaking.

            Best wishes,

            Eye for Video

            www.cidigitalmedia.com

            Best wishes,

            Adninjastrator