4 Replies Latest reply on Dec 14, 2011 8:24 AM by phyllisj9

    OT: Margin recommendations to make creep less noticeable

    phyllisj9 Level 2

      I'm working on a booklet that's sized at 3.625" W x 8.75" H.  I have no idea how many pages the book will be, but it's been as high as 112 pages before.   This book is saddle-stitched, so creep is a problem.  However, multiple people will be working on the book, and I have no idea how many pages it will actually be.  So I see no way to do incremental adjustments.  I was just thinking I'd use a wide-enough margin to be safe throughout the book.  Anybody have any recommendations?  Would 2-pica be enough?  Or too much?  (I'd like to use as little margin as possible.) Should I plan to make the inside margin wider than the outside? 

       

      I read somewhere that using a bleed on the top or bottom would make creep more noticeable.  I don't get that though.  Why would it matter if it were on the top?

       

      The book is printed on 60# paper and gets quite thick. 

       

      Any suggestions?

       

      Thanks, Phyllis

        • 1. Re: OT: Margin recommendations to make creep less noticeable
          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

          According to my chart, 60 # offset text is .0048 thick, and 112 pages means 28 sheets. 28 x .0048 is .1344 inch which is around 10 points. If the margin is only 2 picas, that's nearly 25% of the margin, so my opinion is that the margin should be bigger, but I also think you should look into perfect binding.

           

          If you're going to bleed, you would want to bleed on the outside, too. If the color line stops near, but before, the edge, the trim is going to leave an uneven border that will show more as it gets narrower. But it's not really claer if you intend to add creep inthe imposition to compensate (and whether this would be to spread the pages apart, in which case you need inside bleed, or lose a bit inside), which also has an effect on where you need to compensate.

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          • 2. Re: OT: Margin recommendations to make creep less noticeable
            phyllisj9 Level 2

            Thanks Peter, I'll make the margin larger.  2p6?  Full half-inch?

             

            And you're right that my top bleed would also go off the side (not sure why I'm being dense about that).  I actually don't know how to adjust for creep as this hasn't been a real issue on anything I've worked on.  I assume you make the inside margins larger at certain intervals (?), but I don't know when.  Unfortunately several people will have to work on this project (the others only barely functioning in InDesign), so I doubt I can be too precise about this. 

             

            I do have in a request for perfect-binding prices, but they'll probably stick with the cheapest thing they can get.  These booklets pretty much only have to survive 3 days.  But if it's not crazy expensive, I'm going to try to get them to at least consider perfect binding.  That would mostly eliminate the creep problem, wouldn't it?  My understanding is that perfect binding means the pages are grouped as several signatures and glued (never so many that creep would be seen).  Am I right about that?

             

            Thanks for your input,

            Phyllis

            • 3. Re: OT: Margin recommendations to make creep less noticeable
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              Adjusting for creep is something the printer would do in the imposition, not something you do in ID, so you need to talk to them. A lot depends on the design...

               

              Your analysis of the difference between stitched and perfect binding is good. You can even perfect bind a stack of individual pages (like making a pad).

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              • 4. Re: OT: Margin recommendations to make creep less noticeable
                phyllisj9 Level 2

                Oh okay, I thought it was a manual task.  Thanks for all the info, that's really helpful!

                 

                Phyllis