7 Replies Latest reply on Jan 8, 2012 5:16 PM by RjL190365

    Need some graphics card advice for using 3D and Adobe

    3DtimL

      Below are the specs for the workstation I just bought. I'm planning on upgrading the graphics card to a GeForce GTX 570 (Fermi) 1280MB. The chassis is pretty small, and I'm concerned that it might get too hot. Does anyone have any advice as to whether this machine can handle this card, and whether or not I should by extra fans, or a water cooling system for the card? Thanks in advance!

       

       

       

       

      Processor & Memory:

      • Intel® Core™ i7-2600 Processor (3.40GHz)  
      • Intel® H67 Chipset  
      • 16GB DDR3 Memory (4 slots, 32GB MAX)

        Drives: 

      • 2TB SATA II Hard Drive  
      • 12X Blu-ray Rewritable Drive: Read AND Write CDs/DVDs/Blu-Ray Discs  
      • Front Panel 19-in-1 digital multimedia card reader

        Graphics: 

      • Integrated Intel® HD Graphics (dual monitor capable)

        Communications: 

      • 10/100/1000 Mb/s Gigabit  LAN

        Audio: 

      • Flexible 8-channel audio with jack sensing

        Keyboard & Mouse: 

      • USB Keyboard  
      • USB Mouse

        Expandability (total bays/slots): 

      • 2 x 5.25" external (1 occupied)  
      • 1 x 3.5" external (1 occupied)  
      • 4 x 3.5" internal (1 occupied)  
      • 1 x PCI-Ex16   
      • 2 x PCIe x1

        Ports: 

      • 1x DVI  
      • 1x HDMI  
      • 2 x USB 3.0 ports (rear)  
      • 6 x USB 2.0 ports (2 Front, 4 Rear)  
      • 3 x Audio Ports  
      • 1x S/PDIF out  
      • 1x RJ45

        Operating System: 

      • Genuine Microsoft Windows® 7 Home Premium, 64-bit

        Additional Software: 

      • Microsoft® Office Starter (reduced functionality versions of Word and Excel; not the full version of Microsoft® Office 2010)  
      • Symantec Norton Internet Security 2011 (60-day trial)

        Additional Information: 

      • Dimensions: (HxWxD):  13.9" x 7.1" x 16.9" (approx.)  
      • Power supply: 350W  
      • Lifetime, 24/7 toll-free phone support  
      • 1 Year Limited Parts & Labor Warranty  
      • Email and fax support M-F from 9am-6pm EST
        • 1. Re: Need some graphics card advice for using 3D and Adobe
          RjL190365 Level 4

          Here are the major failings of that "workstation":

           

          1) The power supply is much too weak to handle an upgrade to a GTX 570. Heck, that PSU might not have been capable of actually handling even its claimed 350W - but more like 200W. As such, it's barely capable of handling even that "workstation"'s base configuration with integrated Intel HD 2000 graphics. You will definitely need a new power supply (at least 550W, but preferably 750W to 850W) right away before you can even upgrade the graphics card at all.

           

          2) That PC has only one hard disk. Adobe requires a minimum of at least one additional hard disk (preferably two or more additional disks) in order to run Premiere Pro acceptably well.

           

          3) Change out the H67 motherboard for a Z68 motherboard. H67 cannot overclock the "limited-overclockable" i7-2600 CPU at all. And even with a Z68 motherboard, the fastest that you can run that non-K i7-2600 would be 3.9GHz.

           

          4) As you stated, that small case will not be enough. You will need a much bigger case to handle the load from Premiere Pro plus all of the hardware upgrades that I'm suggesting.

           

          Also, keep in mind that the company only offers "lifetime" technical support if you don't tinker with the PC's innards at all - not even a minor hardware upgrade or only for a vendor-approved hardware upgrade such as RAM. Once you open that case for a non-vendor-approved hardware upgrade (e.g. an upgraded power supply, an upgraded GPU or upgraded cooling), you will no longer have technical support from that company that you're getting the PC from.

           

          As currently equipped, that system will run about 25 to 30 times slower than a fast PC. Look at payal's 622-second result running 5.0.3 on the PPBM5 results list, with the same CPU, chipset and integrated graphics as your system: It is already more than 12 times slower (in terms of the Relative Performance Index) than a fast system - and that system is already running two disks. With only one disk for absolutely everything - the OS, media, projects, previews, cache and exports - it would be much slower than even that because SATA is only a half-duplex interface, not a full-duplex interface. As a half-duplex interface, SATA can only deliver data transfers in one direction at a time. However, video editing programs like PPro require simultaneous reads and writes. This means that the single disk must wait for data transfers in a given direction to be completed before any data starts transferring in the opposite direction.

          • 2. Re: Need some graphics card advice for using 3D and Adobe
            3DtimL Level 1

             

            First off, THANK YOU!!! for your help. I could have made a big mistake with the upgrade alone. Would the following items work together with my current system and with each other? Sorry, I just don't know how to find this stuff out. I also have another hard drive already.

             

            1.Intel BOXDZ68DB LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

             

            2.Rosewill CHALLENGER-U3 Black Gaming ATX Mid Tower Computer Case ,comes with Three Fans-1x Front Blue LED 120mm Fan, 1x Top 140mm Fan, 1x Rear 120mm Fan, front mounted dual USB 3.0

             

            3.Rosewill CAPSTONE Series CAPSTONE-650 650W Continuous @ 50°C, 80 PLUS GOLD Certified, Single +12V Rail, ATX12V v2.31 / EPS12V v2.92, SLI Ready, CrossFire Ready, Active - PFC Power Supply

            • 3. Re: Need some graphics card advice for using 3D and Adobe
              RjL190365 Level 4

              Hi again,

               

              That Rosewill Capstone power supply unit is made by Superflower - the same OEM that also manufactures most of Kingwin's better PSUs. However, while that unit is of relatively better quality compared to the ATNG-manufactured piles of mediocrity sold under the Rosewill name, it is only at about the same level of quality as the 80-Plus Gold PSUs made by Enhance for Cooler Master (such as the Silent Pro Gold line), and not quite as good as the 80-Plus Gold PSUs made by Sea Sonic for Corsair (the AX series up to 850W).

               

              Also, be aware that the Intel DZ68DB, like all other Intel-branded motherboards in its Media Series line, has only five internal SATA ports instead of six; the provision for what would have been a sixth internal SATA port is instead used by a single eSATA port at the rear I/O panel (in other words, the DZ68DB's rear eSATA port is connected directly to the Z68's native PCH SATA controller instead of a separate Jmicron eSATA controller chip like the eSATA ports on many other higher-end motherboards such as those from Asus and Gigabyte). However, that arrangement is ideal for those people who do not want an internally-mounted optical drive but instead want to run their optical drives in a separate external enclosure with an eSATA port on the enclosure (in other words, those people who are really, really picky about optical disc write quality). In addition, the Media Series boards are more difficult than other motherboards to fine-tune the performance to your heart's (or apps') desire: The DIMM voltage is selectable only at discrete settings (e.g. 1.25V, 1.35V, 1.5V, 1.6V or 1.65V - with nothing whatsoever in between adjacent settings), and the VRMs and capacitors are not as capable of sustaining as high of a stable overclock as other brands of motherboards.

              • 4. Re: Need some graphics card advice for using 3D and Adobe
                3DtimL Level 1

                Wow, I wish I had half the hardware knowlege as you. Thanks again. Do you have any recommendations for a power supply and motherboard that would work with the existing components I have including the case (or is there a better case as well) I'm looking to spend about $270 for the case/power supply and motherboard...yeah I'm on a short budget.

                • 5. Re: Need some graphics card advice for using 3D and Adobe
                  Darren Kelly Level 1

                  RLJ said:

                   

                  Change out the H67 motherboard for a Z68 motherboard. H67 cannot overclock the "limited-overclockable" i7-2600 CPU at all. And even with a Z68 motherboard, the fastest that you can run that non-K i7-2600 would be 3.9GHz.

                   

                   

                  I'm on an AMD system, and my motherboard is designed for overclocking. Thing is I don't understand what the benefits would be of over clocking it. Does it really make things go faster, or am I just risking an unstable system? If faster, how much faster. I know the bulldozer chips have been overclocked to something near 11GHz - albeit using liquid nitrogen to cool it, but how much of a benefit is it to us?

                   

                  Enquiring minds want to know?

                  • 6. Re: Need some graphics card advice for using 3D and Adobe
                    Harm Millaard Level 7

                    Look here: Benchmark Results

                     

                    Notice that all systems in the Top 20 are (heavily) overclocked and are all Intel systems. AMD just can't keep up, even when overclocked to absurd frequencies, that significantly reduce stability and longevity.

                    • 7. Re: Need some graphics card advice for using 3D and Adobe
                      RjL190365 Level 4

                      And as I have shown even with my auxiliary i5-2400 system, there is a tangible performance increase with even a moderate overclock of the CPU. Granted, the i5-2400 (and all of the other non-K i5 and i7 CPUs) are limited-overclockable (meaning that the maximum allowable overclock is limited to about 500MHz above the stock clock speed), but 3.6GHz on an i5-2400 gave a 325-second result on PPBM5 (with 8GB of RAM) - a 35-second improvement over that same CPU that's merely Turbo-Boosted to 3.2GHz (the default setting), which achieved about 360 seconds in PPBM5 (both results are with one 2-disk aid0 array plus one OS disk). Middling performances, to be sure, but still fast enough for those who don't work with anything beyond simple consumer-level AVCHD (meaning no RED or nothing above 1080p).