8 Replies Latest reply on Jan 14, 2012 7:24 AM by [Jongware]

    Unicode characters

    m.r.hunter

      How do I import new unicode characters to a font set (glyphs) to include in a book, that will remain intact when exported as epub.

        • 1. Re: Unicode characters
          [Jongware] Most Valuable Participant

          With a font editor, not with InDesign.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Unicode characters
            m.r.hunter Level 1

            is there an adobe font editor?

            • 3. Re: Unicode characters
              Dov Isaacs Adobe Employee

              For better or worse, there is no “Adobe font editor” available. There are some excellent commercial products available such as FontLab and Fontographer. They do have a very steep learning curve though!

               

              Also, if you need additional glyphs, you are much better off to either use or create a different font and not attempt to insert them into an existing commercial font. Depending upon how one “edits” a font, the process may be lossy.

               

                        - Dov

              • 4. Re: Unicode characters
                John Hawkinson Level 5

                For better or worse, there is no “Adobe font editor” available. There are some excellent commercial products available such as FontLab and Fontographer. They do have a very steep learning curve though!

                There's also a free font editor, FontForge, which is not beneath consideration, I believe. (My use of it has been far too spotty to provide the experience necessary to offer a recommendation).

                • 5. Re: Unicode characters
                  MW Design Level 4

                  There is also a free version of Type Light that may be fine for this purpose and the paid-for version isn't much.

                  http://www.cr8software.net/typelight.html

                   

                  I've used the free version of TL on a couple projects in conjunction with another person.

                   

                  The best of the "inexpensive" ones I have used is made by HighLogic:

                  http://www.high-logic.com/

                   

                  And HL's font manager isn't bad, either, if one is so inclined to use one.

                   

                  Take care, Mike

                  • 6. Re: Unicode characters
                    m.r.hunter Level 1

                    Just to be sure I've made my needs clear. I have found a couple of unicode graphics that I want to use in a book layout, but want them to hold up in e-book version and so wonder if importing them into the font set (Adobe Caslon glyphs) means they would hold up in epub - as opposed to inserting them as graphics.

                    • 7. Re: Unicode characters
                      John Hawkinson Level 5

                      Well, I think it really depends on whether the glyphs are available in the font that the EPUB viewer chooses to display your ebook in. I don't know enough about ebook readers to know if they even always use the font you specify...

                       

                      I think the short answer is: test on all platforms you care about.

                      Clearly the "safe" answer is to use inline graphics.

                      • 8. Re: Unicode characters
                        [Jongware] Most Valuable Participant

                        1. You can embed fonts into an ePub, but it may not be permitted by the EULA. And fonts need (?) to be encrypted, and the additional encryption may cause your ePub to be rejected by some resellers. Search a bit on this forum, it has been mentioned a couple of times.

                         

                        2. You can use images for your special characters, but they eon't look as nice as the real font. And naturally, they won't scale along if the user changes his font size.

                         

                        3. If you do not embed fonts and rely on the final reading device (in iBooks on the iPad, the user can choose any font he likes), it's NOT IMPORTANT AT ALL what font you use in InDesign. You can even have INDesign show it as a "missing character" pink box, but it will still export the correct Unicode and that's what's most important.

                         

                        It depends on the reading device and software what happens with 'out of font' glyphs. I have zero experience with anything else than the iPad, but iBooks, for instance, has a series of fallback fonts. If the user has selected a reading font that does't contain a certain character, iBooks will automatically use another font for that one glyph. Fortunately, most of the fonts on the iPad have an extensive range of special characters (then again, the default font appears to be Arial Unicode -- or something like that -- so it boils down to seeing a sans character in some serif text, or seeing nothing at all).

                         

                        ... What sort of special characters are we talking about, by the way? Bullets, or maths, or other writing scripts (Greek, Cyrillic, Arabic, Chinese, etc.), or for specialized notation (linguistics, music, programming)?