4 Replies Latest reply on Jan 13, 2012 1:08 AM by Michael Gianino

    Creating a church anniversary 36-page booklet/program with full bleed.

    Shortknocker

      I am fairly new to CS4 InDesign but would like to create a 36-page Church Anniversary Booklet/Program with full bleed.  The size of the program should be 8 1/2 x 11.  I probably will need to print it on a larger size and get it cut.  (1) How can I create this type of booklet? (2) What size paper should I use to get the full size of 8 1/2 x 11 (I cannot have white edges around the program).  (3) How should I set up the bleed, slug? (4) Should I use facing pages.  (5) I would like to use the same background on all sheets.  Thanks.

        • 1. Re: Creating a church anniversary 36-page booklet/program with full bleed.
          MW Design Level 4

          (2) It will likely be letter extra paper size--but do talk with your print service with your project specs.

           

          (3) Probably no need for a slug. On some stuff, I allow up to .125" for the bleed, the defaults in ID are fine.

           

          (4) If this booklet will be stapled or otherwise bound so there are facing pages, then yes, use facing pages.

           

          (5) Place the same background on the master page(s).

           

          Take care, Mike

          • 2. Re: Creating a church anniversary 36-page booklet/program with full bleed.
            Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

            I'm not sure Mike's answer is entirely clear. You should set up on letter-size facing pages (and you must set the bleed allowance yourself in the Document setup dilalog -- press the more options button -- as the default is 0). If this is going to be printed in house at the church, you'll most likely either print on 11 x 17, one page per side, or 12 x 18, two-page imposed spreads on each side, depending on what your equipment can handle, but that's not important for document setup and layout. We worry about output when we know more.

            • 3. Re: Creating a church anniversary 36-page booklet/program with full bleed.
              Shortknocker Level 1

              What does " two-page imposed spreads" mean? 

              • 4. Re: Creating a church anniversary 36-page booklet/program with full bleed.
                Michael Gianino Level 4

                Shortknocker wrote:

                 

                What does " two-page imposed spreads" mean? 

                If you take two sheets of 8.5x11 paper in a stack, turn them so that the long edge is on top and you fold the left side over the right, it will look like a book in standard reading position. If you write a 1 on the front page, open the book and write 2 on the second, 3 on the third and so on, your last page will be page 8. If you pull the outside sheet and look at the page numbers, you will find page 8 on the left, with page 1 on the right, and on the back you will find page 2 on the left, with page 7 on the right.

                 

                Those pairs of pages (8 & 1, 2 & 7) are two-page spreads (pages that are beside each other), but specifically, they are imposed spreads, also known as printer's spreads. The position of a page within a printer's spread will vary, depending on how many pages there are. For example, a 16 page book will have page 16 to the left of page 1, and page 15 to the right of page 2.

                 

                When you compose the book, page three will be to the right of page 2, in what we call reader's spreads. You will want to compose in reader's spreads, and your print provider will impose the book into printer's spreads. It's important to talk to your printer before you set up the book, so that you will know what is needed.