5 Replies Latest reply on Jan 15, 2012 6:43 AM by Steve Grisetti

    joining snipped ends

    drinsect

      Total newbie, using Premiere Elements 10 for about 3 days now, and I may not be using the correct terminology, so please forgive me.

       

      I'm editing some lecture videos... well the video portion is an electronic capture board I'm making notes on, and the audio is the lecture itself.  I'm snipping out all the pauses, interuptions for questions, places where I wonder off subject, or giving instructions on when something is due, and so on.  So pretty much an 80 minute lecture comes down to around 50 minutes when I'm done.  However the resulting .prel file is made up of dozens of little snipped segments.  What I'm wondering, and haven't been able to find, is there some way to stich all those segments back together so that the prel file appears as a single continous file, like a freshly imported video appears?

       

      I've got a couple of reasons for this.  I'd like to preserve that single file, and then be able to clip it up again as needed to different lengths - so students have smaller files for playback... perhaps 10 minutes per file for smart phones, or 1/2 hour for tablets...  Also I foresee in the future where a lecture has a 5 minute section on a specific thing, such as behavior, and I'd like to later extract that bit and add it to other behavior clips from other lectures, so I can have a video just on behaviors.  I guess in my early learning stages I just see this easier to do if the edited lecture is continuous file, and I'm not trying to snip again within existing snips, or trying to add a hundred numbered markers, etc...   Otherwise its going well, and I'm actualy getting good mp3 output for first attempts, though I haven't gotten fancy with titles and transitions yet.

       

      Thanks for any and all help!

        • 1. Re: joining snipped ends
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Well, yeah. That's kind of what video editing is all about, dr.

           

          Just put all those pieces together on your timeline and then use Share to output your new video. (Which Share option you use depends on how you're going to distribute your video: on DVD, BluRay, online, YouTube, etc.

           

          Meantime, if you're interested in getting to know the basics, check out my free 8 part Basic Training tutorials at Premiere Elements support site Muvipix.com.

          http://forums.adobe.com/thread/537685

           

          They may help you with the terminology as well as the techniques.

          • 2. Re: joining snipped ends
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            Welcome to the forum.

             

            The way to "combine" those Trimmed Clips, is when you Export/Share to an AV file.

             

            What you see on the Timeline are actually proxy files, showing what operations have been performed so far. PrE is a non-destructive editing program, so the original Source Files have not been touched - only a representation of your operations. The PREL file is but an XML database, with links to the original files, and then instructions on what to do, when you Export/Share. At this point, the only thing that exists are those instructions, and then the representation, that you see.

             

            For more info on the PREL files, see this ARTICLE, which also discusses Saving the PREL, in all three variations, plus AutoSaves.

             

            I also will second the rec.for Steve's Basic Training Series, and this ARTICLE has some more learning resources.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: joining snipped ends
              drinsect Level 1

              Thanks guys, very helpful...  I was thiking of the prel file like a .psd file in photoshop - that no matter what you wanted as your end type, it's always useful to save the working psd, since it has the layers, the resolution, the full color depth, etc...  But yeah, sharing to a video file, and then just importing that back in makes total sense.  Do you have a recommended format to keep as a master for later editing, and where do I find it?  I spent a good 40 minutes yesterday trying different things until I found the specific type of MP4 file I wanted to use... hidden under the Igear stuff.   When I first thought to start this, I had a copy of v4 that came with something else, and the share options in that were pretty limited... now its overwhelming!

               

              I'm gonna keep playing around the rest of the weekend, and then go view the tutorials and articles... I get a lot more out of instruction if I manage to mess things up a few times first! 

               

              Thanks again for the speedy replies!

              • 4. Re: joining snipped ends
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                For later editing, there are a couple of choices. If the Project is SD, the DV-AVI is very good. If the Project is HD, then I recommend a lossless intermediate file, and this ARTICLE will give you some suggestions.

                 

                As for Saving, I agree with you, though the PREL is different from a working PSD in Photoshop, though there ARE some similarities, when one gets past the idea that the PREL is an AV file, like the PSD is an Image file.

                 

                Good luck, and learning the differences in the various Save modes, can be very, very important. I use each of the three often, and also rely on the AutoSaves (something that PS has never had, and with good reasons).

                 

                Good luck, and happy editing,

                 

                Hunt

                • 5. Re: joining snipped ends
                  Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                  The video tutorials I linked you to above also include this information.

                   

                  Though my books go into even more step-by-step detail, if you're interested.

                  http://Muvipix.com/pe10.php