2 Replies Latest reply on Jan 18, 2012 1:45 PM by Peter Spier

    How to output from InDesign for best photocopy results?

    hunah

      Hi,

      I need to output a color newsletter created in InDesign to be printed in grayscale for b&w photocopying. Because the newsletter has a few photos and other grayscale images, the InDesign file needs to be printed to my printer at a lower lpi for the best results to be photocopied.

       

      The original is in color because the newsletter is primarily shared digitally. However, the client has a need to print copies on their photocopier for other distribution needs.

       

      How can a file be EXPORTED or SAVED or PRINTED in a way that I can play with the lpi output in order to find the best results with their copier?

       

      Thanks.

        • 1. Re: How to output from InDesign for best photocopy results?
          BobLevine MVP & Adobe Community Professional

          Export it to PDF and open it Acrobat Pro. Convert to grayscale there.

           

           

           

          Bob

          • 2. Re: How to output from InDesign for best photocopy results?
            Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

            Does this need to be copied "off the glass" on this copier, or does it have a printer interface? Copying halftones is always a problem, and you don't normally get to set the screen frequency for a desktop printer (some postscript printers might allow it) -- in general they only have the abilitly, due to low resolution limitations, to output a very small number of actual frequencies and the odds that you'll find a screen that doesn't create an interference pattern onthe copier are pretty small. IF there is any way to adjust the lpi value, it will be in the printer driver.

             

            If the client's copier has a printer interface, that's the way to go. Make a grayscale PDF (or if it's a monochrome machine, just send it the color PDF and see how it prints) and print, rather than copy, so you aren't re-screening the images.