7 Replies Latest reply on Jan 19, 2012 11:06 AM by Harm Millaard

    Will this spec of rig work for HDV and DV editing?

    Billy from Consett Level 1

      Hi Folks

      I've been asked to build a budget HDV editing rig to use on my old CS4 Premiere app. The cost of computer kit seems to have gone up, so I'm considering the following components to use with a HV40 Canon HDV cam.

       

      Win7 64bit

      Intel Sandy Bridge i3 3.4GHz 2130  CPU with 8gb DDR3 1600mhz corsair ram

      Asus P8H67 skt1155 with Sata III mobo

      1x 500gb and 1 x1TB Sata III 7200rpm hard drives

      LG Bluray writer

      500w Antec power supply

      Nvidia GT430 graphics

      Coolermaster case

      23" Samsung monitor

       

      Do I really need an i5 CPU?

      Do I really need a minimum of 3 HDD's?

      Is the graphics card ok?

      Would AMD CPU's be just as good?

       

      Maybe this spec is more than required for HDV, but it seems silly to ultra economise in looking for an older CPU or Sata II.

       

      Thanks

        • 1. Re: Will this spec of rig work for HDV and DV editing?
          Harm Millaard Level 7

          Adobe Forums: What PC to build? An update...

           

          You don't want a dual core i3. i5 is really minimum, because of the quad cores, but it lacks hyper threading that the i7 has. About everything is absolute bare minimum and you will run into limitations of memory, PSU (500 W is very low), disks, the old video card with limited capabilities. Why a H67 mobo when you want a dedicated video card? Why not a Z68?

           

          AMD's are just as good as Intel in terms of they work as well, only AMD does its work slower than molasses in winter and with Intel they fly.

           

          If you need to go from Paris to Beijing, you can fly and it takes you around 11 hours. That is the Intel method. The alternative is using a camel or horse, like Marco Polo did taking the Silk Route for his trading. That takes you about one pregnancy, around 9 months. That is the AMD way. But both get you to Beijing.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Will this spec of rig work for HDV and DV editing?
            Billy from Consett Level 1

            Thanks for your quick reply and update Harm.

             

            I'm considering an cheap i3 rig for this build for a friend, as another friends Pentium duel core rig that stably runs Premiere Pro for HDV, and that rig has got just 2Gb of ram. The use for this rig is hobbist retired video editing. No games.

             

            I myself upgraded to CS5 from CS4 as I felt at the time that CS4 Prem didn't make full use of my own i7 quad core rig. If a quad core rig can encode quicker (or more stable) with an i5 I'll offer my mate this option- the price difference is only about £40.

             

            I've no idea if the GT430 graphics card will be quick enough for Premiere to be stable, I thought that cuda graphics are used from CS5.

             

            I'll check out the Z68 chipset asap - I don't understand the current options for video editing these days. Do you need a graphics card with a mobo with Z68?

             

            Thanks again!

            • 3. Re: Will this spec of rig work for HDV and DV editing?
              RjL190365 Level 4

              Harm Millaard wrote:

               

              You don't want a dual core i3. i5 is really minimum, because of the quad cores, but it lacks hyper threading that the i7 has. About everything is absolute bare minimum and you will run into limitations of memory, PSU (500 W is very low), disks, the old video card with limited capabilities. Why a H67 mobo when you want a dedicated video card? Why not a Z68?

               

              I agree. As you can see from the PPBM5 results list for both an i3-2100 and an i5-2400 (both equipped with 8GB of RAM, the same H61 mobo, GTX 560 card and three non-RAID disks total), the stock i5-2400 is 3.58 times slower than a fast reference system (based on the RPI factor) while the i3-2100 (which cannot be overclocked at all even on a Z68 mobo) is 4.77 times slower than that same reference system. In terms of total times, the stock i5-2400 achieved a result of 378 seconds versus 524 seconds for the i3-2100. I have since replaced the H61 mobo with a Z68 mobo because I found the H61 too limiting for a video editing system. And neither the H61 nor the H67 chipset allows overclocking, nor does it support RAM speeds above DDR3-1333 (DDR3-1600 and faster RAM will be restricted to DDR3-1333 speed), nor does it have all the goodies that make the Z68 the way it is. With the Z68 board, I can crank up the i5-2400 to its maximum 3.6GHz (remember, the non-K i5s are only limited-overclockable) and still achieve faster overall results than most of the other i5s on the PPBM5 results list that are also running CS5.5.

               

              Based on those results, an i3-2130 would at best achieve a result of about 480 seconds (and an RPI factor of at best around 4.35 to 4.4, meaning that the i3-2130 would at best be well over four times slower than the fast reference system). And that's with a good midrange GTX 560 card installed. The GT 430 is much slower than a GTX 560, so your friend should not rely on that card if he ever considers upgrading to CS5.5: With its low-bandwidth DDR3 VRAM, expect the MPEG-2 DVD encoding portion of the PPBM5 benchmark to increase to between 400 and 500 seconds when used with the i3-2130 CPU (versus only about 60 seconds for a fast CPU/GPU combo) when running CS5.5, based on the 311-second MPEG-2 time that I had previously achieved with an i3-2100 with 8GB of RAM and a GT 240 GDDR5 card. (There are currently only two systems with GT 430 cards on the PPBM5 results list, and both of those are AMD CPU-based systems running CS5 5.0.3.)

               

              CS4, on the other hand, in addition to not being able to take full advantage of faster modern systems, is a performance hog on any system (even an extremely fast one) compared to CS5+.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Will this spec of rig work for HDV and DV editing?
                Harm Millaard Level 7

                The use for this rig is hobbist retired video editing. No games.

                 

                That could be me with the only difference that my editing comprises DV, HDV, AVCHD, XDCAM-HD, Canon 422 MXF and occasionally XDCAM-EX. That happens when you have 6 different cameras.

                 

                The link I gave you gives you an example setup for a budget line system, which comes out at around € 1270 over here. You can cut some corners here and there since the bulk of the work is relatively easy with DV and HDV, but what happens when next year your friend's son decides to buy an AVCHD camera or his HDV camera stops working? Then your friend will directly notice the limitations of the system if you cut corners now and then an upgrade may be more expensive.

                • 5. Re: Will this spec of rig work for HDV and DV editing?
                  Billy from Consett Level 1

                  Thanks for your notes guys - very helpful notes.

                   

                  The goal here is not to get good benchmark scores on PBPP5, but it would be good to get the 1600GHz ram to run at full speed. That point is noted.

                   

                  A quad core i5 rig would be really advantageous to cut down rendering for everything. I'm not aware that CS4 is a resource hog mind, but, whatever, I'll recommend an i5 for sure.

                   

                  My friend will never experiment with overclocking. So if the Z68 chipset has a main strength of overclocking, it has little value here. I'm selling him my old CS4 app for £60 and I doubt that he'll ever swap it for CS5 - he's presently got the earliest version of Prem Pro with a 10 year old computer..

                   

                  I've got 4x2gb Corsair 1600mhz DDR3 that I have from my i7 rig to put in, so I'm hoping to use that.

                   

                  My mate is retired and makes movies of going on holiday etc so he doesn't need professional workrate.

                   

                  If we go for a Z68 chipset, can anyone say if he can use the onboard graphics? I know it doesn't sound ambitious or benchmark breaking, but I'm sure balancing the pennies using a more expensive mobo does have a role here to my old friend, just to get a stable editing rig for making either DV or HDV movies, probably for export to miniDV tapes.

                   

                  Thanks Billy

                  • 6. Re: Will this spec of rig work for HDV and DV editing?
                    Billy from Consett Level 1

                    Harm - I can't see any links from you, but am hoping to spend about £750, including Windows.