11 Replies Latest reply on Jan 27, 2012 4:21 AM by Peter Spier

    One Link, Many Instances?

    S. Gordon

      I'm new to InDesign but experienced with Illustrator. I'm using CS5.5.

       

      I've got artwork in Illustrator for a set of 6 icons. I want to import the 6 icon files (in Illustrator format) into InDesign and then copy and paste the icons multiple times in cells in a table I created. My first attempt at this resulted in the Links panel displaying 292 links (divided among the 6 icons). I don't think I'm doing this right. Should the Links panel show just 6 links (one for each imported Illustrator artwork file) and I copy and paste an "instance" of that link? This would be similar to Illustrator where you can convert artwork into a "symbol" and every time you copy and paste you're dealing with a symbol "instance" rather than a duplicate of the actual artwork (thus reducing the file's size).

        • 1. Re: One Link, Many Instances?
          Stix Hart Level 5

          That is how it should be working, although you can see the file multiple times it is only there once in InDesigns memory.

           

          Since CS5 however you have been able to change the way they are diplayed, see the circled arrow in this picture:

           

          1.png

           

          You can click on that to collapse the list down to one line, and it will show in brackets how many instances of the link there are.   If you want to replace the link click on the top line and relink and you'll do all instances at once, or click on an individual instance to only replace that one.

          • 2. Re: One Link, Many Instances?
            S. Gordon Level 1

            Thanks, Stix. That is what I ended up with in my Links panel. A "parent" link, and then underneath it all of the instances of that link resulting from multiple copies and pastes. I found that the file size of an exported PDF was larger than I expected and thought it must be from the 292 individual instances of the 6 parent links.

             

            The other weird thing that happened is when I relinked, there wasn't a command or option in the dialog box for doing all instances of the parent with a single click. Instead I click OK for each of the instances that needed to be relinked; a progress bar displayed as I did this so I knew how far along I was getting.

            • 3. Re: One Link, Many Instances?
              Stix Hart Level 5

              The file size being larger could be many things.  You have a number of options when relinking, the best way to try first off is try relinking one object with Show Options ticked in the place dialog box.  Then try relinking a whole lot with Show Options unticked, that might do it for you.

              • 4. Re: One Link, Many Instances?
                Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                The large PDF probably IS at least partly the result of the many instances. Vectors don't compress, and ID doesn't have the same symbolism technology that is used in Illustrator to reduce file size by storing a symbol once and pointing to it. That said, I believe interactive PDF does do something similar, but if this is for print you probably don't want to go there, and file size shouldn't be terribly concerning.

                • 5. Re: One Link, Many Instances?
                  S. Gordon Level 1

                  Thanks, Peter. I wondered if InDesign used the same technology as Illustrator in representing multiple instances of the same artwork. I guess not. My file consists of a vector map and a table populated with about 300 instances of the 5 vector icons and some text. The PDF ballooned from 613 K to 11.4 MB when exported. It wouldn't be a problem when printing but I'm afraid it could be when PDF proofs are emailed to my client. Thanks again for clarifying how ID handles these multiple links.

                  • 6. Re: One Link, Many Instances?
                    John Hawkinson Level 5

                    InDesign is supposed to include one copy of placed PDF files, as a PDF XObject, and refer to that XObject each time it comes up in the generated PDF. There are a variety of things that can cause that not tohappen, and it might well be that anchored frames in a table is one of those cases.

                    • 7. Re: One Link, Many Instances?
                      Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                      John,

                       

                      Do you remember is if the PDF Xobject method is restricted to exports of PDF (Interactive)? I have that banging around in the back of my head.

                      • 8. Re: One Link, Many Instances?
                        John Hawkinson Level 5

                        My understanding is nearly the reverse, I expect it to work for Print PDFs and wouldn't be surprised if it didn't work for interactive ones. But I guess I don't really know.

                         

                        Dov posted a little bit about it a while back: Re: Printing PDF's

                        I guess it's not that definitive...

                        • 9. Re: One Link, Many Instances?
                          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                          Jive screwed up the link, but I found it.

                           

                          Dov said, "...InDesign 6.x.x has a feature by which non-overriden non-text graphics frames on master pages is output only once during PDF export..."

                           

                          Note that this happens With master page frames, not document page or overridden frames, which wouldn't help the OP.

                           

                          for those that want to read the whole thing, http://forums.adobe.com/message/2604850

                          • 10. Re: One Link, Many Instances?
                            John Hawkinson Level 5

                            That was not my interpretation, but you may well be right. In particular, Dov's point #2 seemed to me to suggest that it should work all the time as long as the image has the same checksum (perhaps he meant MD5 instead of CRC?).

                             

                            On the other hand, whether or not it is allegedly supposed to work in theory, clearly it fails in practice in this particular case.

                            • 11. Re: One Link, Many Instances?
                              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                              Well, you mentioned PDF X objects, and the way I read it, the other optimization doesn't appear to use those, but I'm hardly qualified to analyze or say what is or insn't happening.