8 Replies Latest reply on Jan 31, 2012 6:31 AM by Noel Carboni

    Photoshop's Color Settings

    mer27

      If Windows is using a calibrated ICC Profile that ColorMunki created so that the colors displayed on your monitor are accurate, what working RGB color space ICC Profile should we use while editing RGB images in Photoshop? Should we use the same calibrated ICC Profile that Windows is using created by ColorMunki, or should you use the original sRGB or AdobeRGB ICC Profiles?

       

      If the calibrated ColorMunki ICC Profile is used, a displayed photo in Photoshop appears identical to the same photo shown outside of Photoshop. As in, with the calibrated ICC Profile that Windows now uses.

      If the original uncalibrated sRGB ICC Profile is used, the colors appear differently then the same photo displayed outside of Photoshop.

       

      I'm guessing we should always load the calibrated ICC Profile into Photoshop's: Edit > Color Settings > Working Spaces > RGB's drop down menu in order to be sure that the RGB images loaded in Photoshop are color-correct, or calibrated. Otherwise, there's no point in color calibrating your monitor.

       

      Refers to: Edit > Color Settings window in Photoshop's window.

       

      Note: The monitor is only calibrated by a ColorMunki generated ICC Profile, NO RGB sliders have been touched on the monitor. In other words, the monitors correction is purely cyber, NOT physical.

       

      Also, what should be selected in the: View > Proof Setup's drop down menu: Windows RGB, Monitor RGB, Custom, or other???

       

      Remember, we're trying to ensure that the RGB image we see on our calibrated monitor will be identical to what's seen on another's calibrated monitor. This is so that we can then accurately convert the RGB images into CMYK, next.

        • 1. Re: Photoshop's Color Settings
          Level 7

          >> If Windows is using a calibrated ICC Profile that ColorMunki created so that the colors displayed on your monitor are accurate, what working RGB color space ICC Profile should we use while editing RGB images in Photoshop?

           

          Working space and monitor profile are not connected -- so use whichever working space you want to.

           

          No, you generally do not want use your display profile as a working space.

           

          Yes, uncalibrated apps will show images differently - because they ignore your display profile and don't correct colors for your display.

           

          Photoshop gets the display profile from the OS, and you don't need to set it as the working space.

           

          ProofSetup should only be used when you know what sort of things you need to preview (your printer, an uncalibrated display, etc.).

           

          It sounds like you need to re-read the Photoshop help on color calibration.

          • 2. Re: Photoshop's Color Settings
            D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Whoa, stop right there. This is not nearly as complicated as you think.

             

            The monitor profile is used by Photoshop to display the image without any intervention from you. You calibrate and forget it, don't touch that profile. You can work in any color space you like.

             

            The way this works is that Photoshop converts from the document profile to the monitor profile, on the fly, as it displays the image. The calibrator automatically sets the profile as system default for that monitor at OS level, so that Photoshop knows where to look for it.

             

            When you calibrate, two things happen. The first is that the monitor is calibrated to a basic set of parameters: white point, gamma, luminance, black point. This happens either in the video card or internally in the monitor and affects everything globally.

             

            Then a monitor profile is created. This is a complete description of the monitor's response, in 3-dimensional color space, in its calibrated state. Some applications will use this profile, but most will just ignore it.

             

            ---

             

            The reason Photoshop matches other non color managed applications if you use the ColorMunki profile as document profile, is because you then have effectively disabled color management, so everything will behave identically (but not correctly).

             

            Remember, Photoshop converts from document profile to monitor profile. If they are the same, nothing happens, which is exactly what a non color managed application does: absolutely nothing. It doesn't even matter which profile you use as long as they're the same. The net result is always the same: no color management.

             

            EDIT: cross post

            • 3. Re: Photoshop's Color Settings
              mer27 Level 1

              >>Yes, uncalibrated apps will show images differently , because they ignore your displays profile>>

               

              So, what you saying is, you shouldn't bother spending money on a monitor calibrating device because Photoshop won't use it anyway??? That makes no sense, whatsoever.

               

              The reason you must calibrate a monitor's color is to ensure color consistency is established accross multiple platforms. We calibrated our monitor, now the colors are accurate... How do we ensure that the colors are accurate within Photoshop? That's the question. What ICC Profile should be used? Every other app we own uses the "now calibrated" ColorMunki generated ICC Profile, that Windows now uses. Regardless of what app we use, the colors are consistantly displayed... except in Photoshop.

              ColorMunki simplay modifies Windows sRGB ICC Profile and saves a new version, to be used by Windows and apps, into a Windows system folder.

              • 4. Re: Photoshop's Color Settings
                D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                You're misunderstanding this completely.

                 

                Photoshop will use the monitor profile to display the image. This way the peculiarities of your monitor is compensated so that the file displays correctly. The document profile has nothing to do with this, it is what it is regardless.

                 

                Other applications will not use the profile to display the image, they will just send the document RGB values straight to the display uncorrected.

                • 5. Re: Photoshop's Color Settings
                  mer27 Level 1

                  Okay, but the colors shift within Photoshop depending on what RGB colorspace is selected. Alot. Are ICC Profiles and color spaces not the same? Are we talking about two different things here?

                  • 6. Re: Photoshop's Color Settings
                    D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    No, they're the same, an icc profile describes a color space. Just two ways to describe the same thing.

                     

                    If you convert from one profile to another, you will not see colors change. What happens then is that the RGB values are recalculated to give the same appearance in the other color space.

                     

                    If you assign a different profile, you will see the colors change because the numbers will stay the same, but the meaning of those numbers will be different in a different space.

                     

                    Generally, you want to convert. Assign is really an "advanced" option.

                    • 7. Re: Photoshop's Color Settings
                      Noel Carboni Level 8

                      Said another way, there is one profile that describes the color space of the document and another one that describes the color space of the monitor

                       

                      A color-managed application such as Photoshop makes use of these to display your colors accurately.

                       

                      Other applications may not.  Some do, most don't.

                       

                      Color-management is not a system thing (though the system helps manage the settings).  It's an application thing.

                       

                      What you're setting in Photoshop's Color Settings are what you want Photoshop to set for you by default - e.g., when you create a new document or open one with no profile.

                       

                      -Noel

                       

                       

                      • 8. Re: Photoshop's Color Settings
                        Noel Carboni Level 8

                        Oh, and one other thing:  You are using the terminology kind of loosely in your original post.

                         

                        Calibration and profiling are two different pieces of the puzzle.

                         

                        I'll close with this:  You CANNOT simplify the problem into "what are the best settings?".  You might be able to make some progress with "what are MY best settings, for the kind of work I plan to do?".

                         

                        -Noel