11 Replies Latest reply on Feb 8, 2012 11:27 PM by D Fosse

    How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?

    dmarcht2 Level 1

      How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?

        • 1. Re: How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?
          Noel Carboni Level 8

          Your question is a bit on the terse side, so I'll answer it in a similar vein:

           

          One way is to use the Burn Tool.

           

          -Noel

          • 2. Re: How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?
            dmarcht2 Level 1

            Sorry, I'm new to this. To be more specific, I am trying to tone down a bright light in a room. I tried the burn/dodge tool without much success. I also tried to mask the surrounding area and use the exposure adjustment, but it seems to tone down the whole picture instead of just the hot area. Any suggestions?

            • 3. Re: How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?
              Noel Carboni Level 8

              You could try the Shadows/Highlights filter (Image - Adjust - Shadows/Highlights).  You'll need to move many of the settings off their default values.  It can seem daunting because there are a lot of controls, but take some time with it.

               

              Another tool that's even more sophisticated is the Image - Adjust - HDR Toning feature, which can be used to bring highlights under better control.

               

              You've given up on the Burn Tool, but it has a lot of options that you may not have noticed when you tried it briefly.  It takes some finesse, and you really need to be a bit subtle with it or your image will look over processed, but if you need targeted image adjustments you can get very good results with Burning.

               

              Post a small version of your image if you'd like; perhaps you'll get more direct suggestions.

               

              -Noel

              • 4. Re: How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?
                Noel Carboni Level 8

                Here's an example I just worked up:

                 

                 

                Original image with too-hot sun on face:

                OriginalHotSpotImage.jpg

                 

                Results from careful use of Burn Tool:

                BurnTool.jpg

                 

                Original image with Shadows and Highlights application:

                ShadowsAndHighlights.jpg

                 

                Original image with HDR Toning application:

                HDRToniing.jpg

                 

                Just to give you some ideas what you can accomplish.

                 

                -Noel

                • 6. Re: How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?
                  dmarcht2 Level 1

                  Here's the image. I'm trying to tone down the bright light over the mirror.

                  • 7. Re: How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?
                    Noel Carboni Level 8

                    Do you have the original raw capture for this image?  I ask because you have some overexposed parts up there, and it would be best if you could try to use the recovery features in the Camera Raw converter, because there is often information in the raw file that's lost in the conversion process (especially if you're using the default settings).

                     

                    If not, you may have to do some careful selection around where the light fixture should be (but which is all burned out to white) and then do some careful Burning (or Cloning) to make the wall appear not so burned out.

                     

                    Also, consider working in 16 bits/channel to avoid accumulating 8 bit round-off error.

                     

                    -Noel

                    • 8. Re: How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?
                      Noel Carboni Level 8

                      Doing as I said, this is the kind of result you should be able to get.

                       

                      Retouched.jpg


                      Work gradually and subtly, approach your goal slowly and watch for aberrations as you go along.

                       

                      -Noel

                      • 9. Re: How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?
                        Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional

                        Shadow Highlight can produce some horrible results, so if you do go that way, open the filters menu first and choose Convert for Smart filters.  Then go back and use Shadow highlight, and you'll have the option of masking it just to the area around the light.

                         

                        But I still never use Shadow Higlight.

                         

                        I would carefully select the light, and copy to a new layer.  Open a new layer between the background and light layers.  Use a fully soft 10% opacity brush, and sampling colour from around the light, gradually build up tone stroke by stroke.  You could possibly use a Layer style on the light layer to give it and outer glow.

                         

                        The above trick is also great for toning down hot spots on faces where direct flash has caused nasty artefacts.

                        • 10. Re: How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?
                          dmarcht2 Level 1

                          Thanks Noel and Trevor. That's what I was looking for. I'll try it.

                          • 11. Re: How do I tone down hot spots in CS5?
                            D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                            One thing that hasn't been mentioned yet, but that is often useful for situations like this, is to load a luminosity mask and do the adjustment - whatever it is - inside that.

                             

                            Press ctrl/cmd+alt+2 to load the selection, and then make the mask from that. This can be applied to all of the above techniques.

                             

                            The mask itself can be modified with Curves, or it can be made from individual channels. Or you can put the whole thing inside a group (ctrl/cmd+G) and mask the group separately to paint in the masked adjustment locally.