8 Replies Latest reply on Feb 25, 2012 7:41 PM by DTwo22

    How do I set up PP to obtain a quality pic on HD TV from a Super 8 camera that outs @ 720x480 29.97?

    DTwo22

      I can get great pictures from my AVCHD camera when making a DVD, however, the quality is poor when I capture video from an old Super 8 camera.   I know I am starting with low quality video, but I would just like a decent picture on my HD TV from the DVD I create.   The video has been captured as an "AVI" file.   It looks crisp and sharp in the Program window of PP and the Encore window.    But when I view the video on my HD TV, it looks anemic.   Has anyone come across this problem before and knows what to tweek to get a better looking picture?   I am open to having a narrower width picture if necessary just to achive a decent quality picture on an HD TV.

       

      Another issue I am experiencing is that the bottom few lines of the caputred video is bad.    I can get around this by scaling my picture up to 104%.   When I do that, the quailty further degrades.   I am not sure this is due to the camera being bad or it is from the converter I am using.   Anyone ever come across this problem?   And how did you solve it?

       

      I would appreaciate any help I can get.  Please remember I am somewhat of a newbie at this, so I ask that your response not be very technical.    Any step by step instructions would be of great help.   Thanks in advance.

       

      Duane

        • 1. Re: How do I set up PP to obtain a quality pic on HD TV from a Super 8 camera that outs @ 720x480 29.97?
          Harm Millaard Level 7

          the quality is poor when I capture video from an old Super 8 camera.

           

          Do you mean Super 8 celluloid material or Hi-8 DV material? If the latter and the end product is DVD, start with a DV sequence and downrez the AVCHD material. Don't uprez the Hi-8 DV material.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: How do I set up PP to obtain a quality pic on HD TV from a Super 8 camera that outs @ 720x480 29.97?
            DTwo22 Level 1

            Thanks for your reply Harm.  I may have mis-led you by even mentioning AVCHD.   I was trying to use it as an example that everything works well when I am working wtih AVCHD.  The Hi-8 DV is a separate project I am working on for my father-in-law.  It is this format that I am having problems with.  Hi camera is a Sony Handycam Vision.   You are correct, it is Hi-8 DV.    Except for the few bad lines at the bottom of the picture, the video looks great in the Program Monitor and decent on my computer monitor.   This tells me that the capture process is working well.   I realize that I am capturing low resolution video.   I would like to know if there is anything more like change the settings in PP and/or Encore that I could be doing to make this video look better on a HDTV?    In other words, what things can be done to take a low res video and make it look decent on a HDTV?   For example, should I capture the video differently, or should I use a different Sequence setting other than DV, or convert it to something different in AME, or change settings in Encore?   And maybe nothing can be done.   And maybe this low resolution video can never look good on a HDTV.    One thing I have considered doing as a last resort is to confine the video to a box or an old looking TV screen.    The picture would be smaller, but it should be clearer.

            How would you approach this dilemma?

            • 3. Re: How do I set up PP to obtain a quality pic on HD TV from a Super 8 camera that outs @ 720x480 29.97?
              SAFEHARBOR11 Most Valuable Participant

              Hi Duane,

               

              How are you capturing the video - do you have a capture card, or analog to DV converter of some kind?

               

              One of the easiest things to do to get better-looking DVDs on an HDTV is to get a newer DVD player (or Blu-ray) with HDMI output. These will upconvert the footage to HD and it will look better than taking SD analog signals out of the player and letting the display blow them up.

               

              "Hi-8 DV" - do you mean Digital 8? There is no Hi-8 DV format. Hi-8 is an analog format using 8mm tape. DV is digital using DV tape. Digital 8 is the DV video format, but recorded to Hi8 tape stock.

               

              How long is the program being put on DVD? The longer the video, the more compressed the video, equals lower quality.

               

              Thanks

               

              Jeff Pulera

              Safe Harbor Computers

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: How do I set up PP to obtain a quality pic on HD TV from a Super 8 camera that outs @ 720x480 29.97?
                Bill Engeler Level 2

                The old video will never look good on a big screen.  I would reduce the size, as you mentioned. Put black video in the track below, reduce the size of the track with the image to 65%, or whatever you want, then nest the 2 tracks.  The idea of putting it in a frame that looks like a TV could work OK, as well.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: How do I set up PP to obtain a quality pic on HD TV from a Super 8 camera that outs @ 720x480 29.97?
                  DTwo22 Level 1

                  Thanks Jeff, you raised some interesting questions.  First, the video is being captured from a camera that is labeled Hi8 XR.   The tape is 8mm tape and is labeled Hi8.   The converter I am using is made by ADS Tech and the model is "PYRO A/V LinK."    The video is connecte with a S-video cable and the audio is connect to the red and white RCA jacks.   The other option is to use the yellow RCA jack for the video.  I just thought that I would be better off using the S-Video jack tahn the yellow RCA jack.   I am using a firewire cable from the device to the back of the computer.   Do you think my capture device is adequate?  Do you think the quality issue at the bottom of the screen is due to the capture device and not the camera?

                   

                  As for the player, it is for both DVD and Blu-ray and is connected with an HDMI cable.   It is a Sony BDP-BX57 which was sold by Costco.   The BS58 is now the current model they sell.   My time line is about 1 hour and 15 min after editing.   I can see in Encore that the video takes up all of the DVD.     Would I be better off burning this on a Blue-ray Disk?      I have several tapes that are over two hours in length and they will have to be put on Blu-ray. So I have no problem moving to Blu-ray if it will help my quality.

                   

                  Thanks,

                   

                  Duane

                  • 6. Re: How do I set up PP to obtain a quality pic on HD TV from a Super 8 camera that outs @ 720x480 29.97?
                    DTwo22 Level 1

                    Thanks Bill.   I think you are correct.   I am just trying to find out if there are things that I could do to optimize this video to get a better picture on an HDTV.   I like your black track idea.  I just may try that.  

                     

                    Thanks,

                     

                    Duane

                    • 7. Re: How do I set up PP to obtain a quality pic on HD TV from a Super 8 camera that outs @ 720x480 29.97?
                      SAFEHARBOR11 Most Valuable Participant

                      Hi Duane,

                       

                      Thanks for clarifying the hardware setup. Using the S-video connection from Hi8 to the DV converter is a good workflow. If you are showing a few errant lines at the bottom, that is a by-product of analog tape and please keep in mind that they are likely in the "overscan" area which normally does not show up to the TV viewer, though you see it in the edit software because you see the full overscan image edge-to-edge. So you probably don't have to worry about that, but if it bugs you, you can use the CROP effect to remove, or create a black title overlay to "hide" that stuff. As you said earlier, you can scale the whole picture up, but that is going to soften the image, not good.

                       

                      As for shrinking the picture - this is only helpful when producing HD content (i.e Blu-ray) and mixing in some SD source material. I see this used on HD documentaries a lot. When they need to show some older SD footage, it is shown "actual size" over some sort of background. By showing the SD clip at actual size, it is not scaled at all and keeps it's quality on the HD display. If making a DVD, which is standard definition, then there is nothing to gain from this practice and it would in fact make things worse because you are reducing the resolution!

                       

                      For a 75-minute project, I would use CBR 7.0 encoding to MPEG-2 for DVD.

                       

                      Jeff Pulera

                      Safe Harbor Computers

                      1 person found this helpful
                      • 8. Re: How do I set up PP to obtain a quality pic on HD TV from a Super 8 camera that outs @ 720x480 29.97?
                        DTwo22 Level 1

                        Thanks again Jeff.   You are most helpful.   I was delayed here as I lost a hard drive in my NAS.   Fortunately it was mirrored and I was able to back it all up to another NAS.   Lost 3 days to backing up the defective drive and another two days haggling with Buffalo.   During this problem I had another discussion with my father-in-law about the use of Blu-ray.   He finally agreed that it was the way to do this project.  I purchased a Blu-ray burner and some disks today.     I use Adobe Illustrator to make a box with a rectangular opening.  I am imported that into PP and re-sized every thing to fit properly.   I added some titles and it all looks great.  

                        My nest question is how should I encode this for Blu-ray?    I am also curiouis to know how and when do you know when to use CBR vs VBR?  

                         

                        Duane