9 Replies Latest reply on Mar 5, 2012 11:10 AM by Steve Grisetti

    DIGITAL IMAGES IN PREMIER ELEMENTS

    rode40 Level 1

      Is there a limit on the number of still images that can be incorporated into a video?

       

       

        • 1. Re: DIGITAL IMAGES IN PREMIER ELEMENTS
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          We always recommend optimizing them to no larger than 1000x750 pixels in size.

           

          But aside from that, it varies from machine to machine. Some people can do 400 -- others start to choke up at 40. Though I'd recommend keeping it below 50 and rendering often as you work, unless you've either got a super computer or you're a masochist.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: DIGITAL IMAGES IN PREMIER ELEMENTS
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            I do not know of any limit, but as Steve mentions, that the computer's power, and the pixel x pixel dimensions of the Still Images will determine the number, probably well before some limit, imposed by the code of the program, comes into play. While not apples to apples, I have one mega-opus with 3000+ 720 x 480 Stills, 100's of MOV files and 100's of AVI files, with maybe 800 Titles - but that is in PrPro on my workstation, so there are major differences, that might reflect on PrE's "big brother," and not on PrE itself.

             

            Now, for Scaling Sitlls in Photoshop, or Photoshop Elements, this ARTICLE  might be useful to you.

             

            Good luck, and how many Still Images were you thinking about?

             

            Hunt

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: DIGITAL IMAGES IN PREMIER ELEMENTS
              N9JCR Level 2

              I just finished a slide show with just under 2,000 stills and a few AVI's so not as large as Bill's, but I'm using PRE 10 and with trouble at all.  My stills are 1050 x 700 and the PC is an Intel i7 with 12GB RAM.   PRE 10 has been extremely stable for me compared to previous versions so if you aren't on 10 yet it's a good investment.

               

              Bob

              • 4. Re: DIGITAL IMAGES IN PREMIER ELEMENTS
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                Bob,

                 

                That is great info to know. I have never done a really large Project in PrE, as I use PrPro much more often.

                 

                Thank you,

                 

                Hunt

                • 5. Re: DIGITAL IMAGES IN PREMIER ELEMENTS
                  nealeh Level 5

                  Wow - 2,000 slides at say 5 seconds per slide is nearly three hours. You must have some very patient viewers (or a physically captive audience!)

                   

                  Cheers,

                  --

                  Neale

                  Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                  • 6. Re: DIGITAL IMAGES IN PREMIER ELEMENTS
                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                    Now, I was thinking that Bob had "captivating images... "

                     

                    Hunt

                     

                    PS - In my case, the Project is a 5-DVD set, so a viewer can play them incrementally, over the course of a few days.

                    • 7. Re: DIGITAL IMAGES IN PREMIER ELEMENTS
                      N9JCR Level 2

                      It's an elementary school slide show that changes regularly.  They have a flat-screen TV and DVD player in the hallway where kids line up, wait for busses, etc. so nobody is watching the whole thing.  I use PgcEdit to make the DVD repeat. So yes, somewhat a captive audience!


                      Bob

                      • 8. Re: DIGITAL IMAGES IN PREMIER ELEMENTS
                        rode40 Level 1

                        Hi all

                         

                        Thanks for the replies.  All very helpful but the more I learn about PrEl the more I come to realise how complex a programme it is and as a so called "silver surfer" my old brain doesn't assimilate information as quickly as it used to.

                         

                        As regards my original query, I have, at a guess, something like 50-60 still images currently in my project with possibly around another 20-30 to still be added so compared to some of your projects it isn't that many.  Anyway I will dutifully resize them to720 x 480 or 1000 x 750 (which would be best). The images I am using are either 3216 x 2136, 4288 x 2848 or 3072 2304) so I guess PrEl was having difficulty in "digesting" these large files.

                         

                        A secondary question.  When I resize using PhotoshopElements 10 is there a way to resize en bloc or can they only be rezized one at a time?  Further advice would be appreciated.

                         

                        Roy

                         

                        PS to Steve.  Ordered a copy of your book from Amazon USA as it's not available here in UK.  

                         

                         

                         

                        PPS Details of my system

                        PC Dell Inspiron 531

                        Internal Hard Drive 232 Gb (152Gb free)

                        External Hard Drive 232Gb (126Gb free)

                        Processor AMD Athlon 64x2 Dual core Processor 4400+ 2.30GHz

                        Installed memory 2.00Gb

                        System 32-bit operating system.

                         

                        Any comments on the above?

                        • 9. Re: DIGITAL IMAGES IN PREMIER ELEMENTS
                          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                          Thanks for supporting the book, Roy!

                           

                          In Photoshop Elements, under the File menu, you'll find a tool called Process Multiple Files. You can use it to resize an entire folder of photos in one pass. You can even direct it to store your resized photos in another folder so that you can keep your originals at full resolution.