7 Replies Latest reply on Mar 16, 2012 11:40 AM by Noel Carboni

    .CR2 Image Setting

    manojb05 Level 1

      Hi all,

      We done photoshoot for our client, we received all pic from .CR2 file,We have .cr2 convert. i am not a familar in .cr2 or RAW IMAGE  please tel me what is the fundamental setting done for RAW image or .CR2 image.

      Regards

      Manoj

        • 1. Re: .CR2 Image Setting
          Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional (Moderator)

          There is no 'fundamental setting' for CR2 files. I don't even use camera profiles because every image needs its own set of adjustments, but Adobe Camera RAW is definitely the best tool for the job IMO. If you work through the files from Bridge, then you can load multiple files into ACR, Synchronise them, and apply the same settings to all the files at once. Or you can work on one file, then load the next into ACR and use Previous settings from the drop down at the top right of the screen. This often gets you close, but I find I am never satisfied and ALWAYs adjust every RAW file individually.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: .CR2 Image Setting
            Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional (Moderator)

            Whilst we are talking about ACR, I did a large event at the weekend, and it struck me while working though the RAW files using Bridge and Photoshop, that I would not have been able to process the files any faster using Lightroom.  I do wish I could apply more ACR settings with keyboard shortcuts though.  Post Crop Vignette' for instance.  It's hugely useful for dealing with images shot in very bright conditions, and I used it in most of the images from the weekend gig.  Different amounts for every image though, so I'd love a keyboard shortcut that gave me a minus 10 vigenette with each operatopn of the shortcut.

            • 3. Re: .CR2 Image Setting
              c.pfaffenbichler Level 8

              This is the Photoshop Forum, there is a dedicated Camera Raw Forum.

              http://forums.adobe.com/community/cameraraw

               

              But I’m not sure you will get all the information you need to properly do your job instantly there, either.

               

              Anyway, one important feature in my opinion are the clipping warnings.

              cameraRawClippingWarning.jpg

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: .CR2 Image Setting
                PECourtejoie Adobe Community Professional

                Hello, you need to have a version of the Camera Raw plug-in that supports the RAW files from that camera.

                You should be running the latest version of the Camera Raw plug-in for your version of Photoshop. If the camera is not supported, you must use the latest version of the DNG converter on the CR2 files, so that they can be opened as DNG by the Camera Raw plug-in.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: .CR2 Image Setting
                  manojb05 Level 1

                  thanks all your valuable feedback. I am using  Digital Photo Professional for converting to raw file to JPG & TIFF, anybody know before i make jpg can i make any setting to improve a photo.

                  • 6. Re: .CR2 Image Setting
                    PECourtejoie Adobe Community Professional

                    That is a question that should be asked in a Canon forum or one dedicated to DPP...

                    • 7. Re: .CR2 Image Setting
                      Noel Carboni Level 8

                      I suggest you use Adobe's Camera Raw facility to open the file into Photoshop, using 16 bits/channel data depth.  This will give you slightly better information to work with than DPP, though in many cases it will take some work with the sliders to make the color seem as pleasing as that which the Canon software produces.

                       

                      Whatever you do, you probably DON'T want to use JPEG format as an intermediate format between DPP and Photoshop, because some information is lost during the save operation (JPEG uses a lossy compression).  Use the 16 bit TIFF format as the go-between if you really want to use DPP as the raw converter.

                       

                      -Noel