9 Replies Latest reply on Mar 15, 2012 5:53 AM by Kit Lebone

    CS2 INX to CS5.5 conversion problem

    Kit Lebone

      When exporting my CS2 layouts as INX files and open them in CS5.5 this happens:

       

      test.jpg

      The page on the left is the CS2 doc (how it should look), the page on the right is the INX opened in CS5.5. (Note how the background tint has also changed)

       

      The reason for exporting as INX was to try and get round an ongoing problem of overset text on certain columns when exporting  as IDML in CS5.5 (from converted CS2 docs)

       

      Hope this makes sense!

       

      Any advice as to why this might be happening much appreciated....

       

      Thank you

        • 1. Re: CS2 INX to CS5.5 conversion problem
          BobLevine MVP & Adobe Community Professional

          Just so everyone’s clear the issue was originally a problem with InCopy text flow being different than the InDesign file. I advised Kit to make sure that all of the stories have been recomposed before exporting to InCopy and there were two methods discussed. Export to INX from CS2 and open that in CS5.5 or open the INDD file in CS5.5 and export as IDML and open that.

           

           

           

          This forces all stories to recompose at once. The other method was to use the KBSC to do it but I felt getting rid of any other extraneous junk would be taken care of by exporting to INX/IDML.

           

           

           

          Bob

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          • 2. Re: CS2 INX to CS5.5 conversion problem
            Kit Lebone Level 1

            Thanks for clarifying.

            • 3. Re: CS2 INX to CS5.5 conversion problem
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              Reflow of the text is to be expected when recomposing using the text engine in a different version. As far as the shift in color, make sure you are using the same color settings in both versions, and that you have the same screen mode (separations preview, proof colors, etc.) enabled. Could also be a case of a difference in Transparency Flattener space.

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              • 4. Re: CS2 INX to CS5.5 conversion problem
                Kit Lebone Level 1

                One thing that's still bugging me (and maybe I'm missing something here) but when I open my CS2 document in CS5.5 all text is present (no overset text). If I then export to IDML in CS5.5 and open the IDML I get overset text.

                 

                Apologies if you've explained why this is to me already, I just need to get this straight in my head.

                • 5. Re: CS2 INX to CS5.5 conversion problem
                  Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                  ID doesn't recompose a story in a legacy .indd file until you touch it in some way. Click your cursor in the CS2 file you open in CS5.5 and the text in that story will reflow. It's best to get that out of the way before you discover a nasty surprise at the end.

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                  • 6. Re: CS2 INX to CS5.5 conversion problem
                    Kit Lebone Level 1

                    I'm with you (both)... finally! Thanks so much for all your help

                    • 7. Re: CS2 INX to CS5.5 conversion problem
                      John Hawkinson Level 5

                      (By the way, Kit's other post isText flow problem).

                       

                      Bob noted:

                      Just so everyone’s clear the issue was originally a problem with InCopy text flow being different than the InDesign file. I advised Kit to make sure that all of the stories have been recomposed before exporting to InCopy and there were two methods discussed. Export to INX from CS2 and open that in CS5.5 or open the INDD file in CS5.5 and export as IDML and open that.

                       

                      This forces all stories to recompose at once. The other method was to use the KBSC to do it but I felt getting rid of any other extraneous junk would be taken care of by exporting to INX/IDML.

                      I'm not 100% sure that doing the INX export is the best way to go.

                      There are some ... rough edges in InDesign's conversion between different versions, and the rough edges are different with INX/IDML export/import than they are with CS2 -> CS5.5. (Not necessarily better...but different.)

                       

                      You might find that simply forcing CS5.5 to do a recomposition of all text is better. As Bob said (in the other thread), you can use the keyboard shortcut Cmd-Alt/Opt-Slash (/). Or alternatively, use Quick Apply: Cmd-Enter (or Control-Center), and type it in and select it:

                       

                      Screen Shot 2012-03-14 at 7.43.56 PM.png

                      Alternatively, you could export to IDML from CS5.5 (rather than INX from CS2).

                      I would expect that to give you fewer rough edges (but your milage may vary).

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                      • 8. Re: CS2 INX to CS5.5 conversion problem
                        Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                        John Hawkinson wrote:

                         

                        Alternatively, you could export to IDML from CS5.5 (rather than INX from CS2).

                        I would expect that to give you fewer rough edges (but your milage may vary).

                        Anecdotally, however, the .inx from CS2 is less likely to have problems later in the editing process, though if the .idml export is the first thing you do there may not be much difference. Belt and suspenders pragmatist that I am, though, I use the .inx approach.

                        • 9. Re: CS2 INX to CS5.5 conversion problem
                          Kit Lebone Level 1

                          That seems to be doing the trick... been through all my old CS2 templates now and recomposed