7 Replies Latest reply on Mar 15, 2012 6:40 PM by Chad Kopec

    Best way to move in nested sequence

    EditorPete Level 1

      Hi,

      Wondering if there is a global move (dve) inside a nest for moving multiple clips (like a film strip) without losing their sides. Of course if I jump outside the nest to do the move, the edge raster plays into it.

       

      Thanks in advance,

      Pete

       

      PP 5.5.2

        • 2. Re: Best way to move in nested sequence
          Ann Bens Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          I am not quite sure but in the main seqence you can move content in a nest by using the slip tool.

          • 3. Re: Best way to move in nested sequence
            EditorPete Level 1

            I guess I should of explained better. Sorry. So I'm taking 5 clips into a nest all on their own layers. Once inside the nest, I'm arranging the 5 clips by sizing them down to lets say 35%.

            Now I'll take the top most layer and move it all the way to the left with about 10% hanging out of raster on the left. Even though you can't see the left side of the video, its still there. Then align all the other layers butted up to eachothers right side. The result will have some of your clips off the right side of the screen. A film strip of sorts. Now jump out or your nest and do a horizontal move to the left on the nest. Only the videos you see, before you do the move, are moving. Outside of the nest, doesn't respect the inside videos being out of raster.

             

            Another way to look at it, is bringing in a bigger than your sequence still file. Put that with some other video or still into a nest and jump back out of your nest and do a pan and scan.

            Does it work?

             

            Thanks and sorry if I confused anyone even more.

             

            Pete

            • 4. Re: Best way to move in nested sequence
              Chad Kopec

              I think I see what you're trying to do.  I know you're asking for a Premiere answer, but if you have After Effects you will find it much easier to accomplish what you're after.

               

              If you have AE, import your clips and arrange them how you'd like.  Then, parent the clips to each other (or a null object) and animate the master clip (or null) to move however you'd like.  An AE help file search for "parent" and "null" will help explain more.  If you don't have AE, then it will be a tedious job in Premiere.

               

              Good luck,

               

              -Chad

              • 5. Re: Best way to move in nested sequence
                Jim Curtis Level 3

                Hey Chad, what's up! 

                 

                Ae is a great way to do this.  Pete may not have Ae, and if we're on the right track, I think it can be done in Pr.

                 

                 

                Pete, Pr "doesn't respect the inside videos being out of raster."

                 

                Try this:

                 

                Create a New Sequence, using custom settings, and make it twice as wide and just as tall as your main sequence (or, make it twice as tall and just as wide if you want a vertical "film-strip").

                 

                Then, lay all your clips out, side by side in the wide (or tall) sequence, creating your film-strip, without the clips edges extending beyond the raster.

                 

                Then, put that wide (or tall) sequence into your main sequence as a layer, which you can pan without losing any resolution (as long as you don't scale it up), and without cutting off any edges.

                • 6. Re: Best way to move in nested sequence
                  EditorPete Level 1

                  Thanks everyone for their input. Jim, your work flow did the trick. Thanks!!! I do have AE, but if there is no need to go outside PP, then so be it.

                   

                   

                  Thanks again,

                  Pete

                  • 7. Re: Best way to move in nested sequence
                    Chad Kopec Level 1

                    Hey, Jim!

                     

                    That's a great, simple solution.

                     

                    Pete, glad it worked out...