4 Replies Latest reply on Apr 15, 2012 6:51 AM by Leewhite57

    Getting my indesign files to look what I'm out putting from Photoshop

    Leewhite57

      Has anyone printed Blurb books using Indesign. There is supposedly this PDF work flow for Blurb books when using Indesign for Blurb books. Yet the printers that Blurb uses are best suited for SRGB like most labs..

      Blurb strongly recommend one convert their files to CMYK when using Indesign.

      I'm trying to figure out why in photoshop my files which will have great color and contrast and I'm using the custom proof setting in Photoshop for the  Blurb ICC profile which is CMYK. Yet same color

      file inside of Indesign will look different. Help

      I'm getting to the point of looking at the rgb color values of my files in the information  menu in Photoshop. So once i get my files back where I might have remove a certain amount of red from the file.

      The blurb book may come back with the image being too red for my liking which is why I will remove some red from my fils. If I remove a certain amount of red out of the file only to receive a Blurb book where the file

      comes back looking a bit too yellow. I need a more consistent way of judging my colors for this Blurb PDF workflow for using Indesign CS5.5  Plus you can get  a proofs  from Blurb and there isn't any comparison ink jet paperto use

      on a ink jet printer to smilar the output for the blurb books

      Blurb uses HP pritnters to print their digital book. Help.

        • 1. Re: Getting my indesign files to look what I'm out putting from Photoshop
          rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          I'm using the custom proof setting in Photoshop for the  Blurb ICC profile which is CMYK. Yet same color file inside of Indesign will look different. Help

           

          You mean in Photoshop you are editing in RGB (sRGB?) and soft proofing through Blurb's custom CMYK profile, then placing the RGB file in ID (you're not converting to CMYK)? If so, are you also setting up ID's proof setup the same way—the Working RGB space matches Photoshop's  (sRGB), and the Proof Setup matches also (Blurb CMYK)?

           

          Keep in mind the Proof Setup/Proof Colors feature in both programs soft proof source color (the file's color mode and values) to a destination device without actually making the color conversion. So you could be soft proofing to a specific device, but sending out different color—i.e. you soft proof to a custom CMYK profile, but hen send out an unchanged PDF with a mix of RGB and CMYK objects.

          • 2. Re: Getting my indesign files to look what I'm out putting from Photoshop
            Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

            And there's also the possibility that the profile isn't accurate. Just because they send it out doesn't mean they take the time to keep the printers calibrated. I recently had a job printed on an Indigo (not by Blurb) and went to the trouble to have sample prints made of the color critical pages so I could make sure I had my color right using the profile supplied.  Several weeks later when they finally got around to sending the client a proof of the final book layout, the color wan't even close to the samples he approved.

            • 3. Re: Getting my indesign files to look what I'm out putting from Photoshop
              rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Looking at Blurb's printing specs they recommend sending sRGB not CMYK:

               

              http://www.blurb.com/educators/pdf/Blurb-Photographer-FAQ-02-18-09.pdf

               

              They do offer a CMYK profile for soft proofing probably so users see RGB color in some CMYK gamut. I think most online printers do not allow CMYK to be output unchanged particularly if they offer uncoated printing—where unchecked total ink would be an obvious problem in an automated offset process.

               

              Blurb offers one CMYK profile (looks like they've simply renamed Coated GRACoL) even though they print on a variety of coated and uncoated sheets, so even if you converted everything to CMYK using the provided profile, it is unlikely that those CMYK values would get printed—Coated GRACol would not work for Mohawk Superfine.

               

              Since it's likely that all color will get converted on their end, providing the recommended sRGB and avoiding extra conversions is the best bet.